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Grants.gov

DoD, Breast Cancer, Breakthrough Award Level 4

Funding Opportunity ID: 326657
Opportunity Number: W81XWH-20-BCRP-BTA4-2
Opportunity Title: DoD, Breast Cancer, Breakthrough Award Level 4
Opportunity Category: Discretionary
Opportunity Category Explanation:
Funding Instrument Type: Cooperative Agreement
Grant
Category of Funding Activity: Science and Technology and other Research and Development
Category Explanation:
CFDA Number(s): 12.420
Eligible Applicants: Unrestricted (i.e., open to any type of entity above), subject to any clarification in text field entitled “Additional Information on Eligibility”
Additional Information on Eligibility:
Agency Code: DOD-AMRAA
Agency Name: Department of Defense
Dept. of the Army — USAMRAA
Posted Date: Apr 30, 2020
Close Date: Oct 06, 2020
Last Updated Date: Apr 30, 2020
Award Ceiling: $0
Award Floor: $0
Estimated Total Program Funding: $16,000,000
Expected Number of Awards: 1
Description: The intent of the Breakthrough Award is to support promising research that has high potential to lead to or make breakthroughs in breast cancer. The critical components of this award mechanism are:Impact: Research supported by the Breakthrough Award will have the potential for a major impact and accelerate progress toward ending breast cancer. The impact may be near-term or long-term, but must move beyond a minor advancement and have the potential to lead to a new approach that is fundamentally better than interventions already approved or in clinical development. Applications are expected to identify the breast cancer patients or at-risk individuals who would ultimately benefit from the proposed research.Research Scope: The Breakthrough Award is structured with four different funding levels. The levels are designed to support major (but not all) stages of research that will lead to clinical application. Each level has a defined research scope. It is the responsibility of the Principal Investigator (PI) to select the level that aligns with the scope of the proposed research. The funding level should be selected based on the research scope defined in the Program Announcement, and not on the amount of the budget.The current Program Announcement discusses the Breakthrough Award Level 4. Funding Levels 1, 2, and 3 are available under other Program Announcements (W81XWH-20-BCRP- BTA12-2 for Levels 1 and 2 and W81XWH-20-BCRP-BTA3-2 for Level 3). The PI is strongly encouraged to review the research scope defined under each funding level as described in the corresponding Breakthrough Award Program Announcements before submitting the pre- application. An application that does not meet the intent of Funding Level 4 will not be recommended for funding, even if it might meet the intent of a different funding level.The following is a general description, although not all-inclusive, of the scope of research projects that would be appropriate to propose under the current Program Announcement:Funding Level 4: Large-scale projects that will transform and revolutionize the clinical management and/or prevention of breast cancer. Human clinical trials are required. PIs are expected to have experience in successfully leading large-scale projects and demonstrated ability (through personal experience or via a commitment from a collaborating clinical investigator) to implement a clinical project successfully. Where relevant, applications must demonstrate availability of and access to necessary data, human samples, cohort(s), and/or critical reagents. For proposed research that will require U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) involvement, project readiness requirements at the time of application submission include: proof of availability of and access to clinical reagents (e.g., therapeutics) that meet regulatory compliance guidelines, proof of availability of and access to appropriate subject population(s), validated projections for patient recruitment, and submission of an Investigational New Drug (IND) or Investigational Device Exemption (IDE) application to the FDA, if applicable.
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3D Printing Industry

3D Printing News Sliced: Dr. Hans Langer, Cuttlefish, RIZE, Senvol, Henkel, Open Bionics

The 3D Printing Industry news digest offers a summary of the latest partnerships, award presentations, software updates, material releases and applications from across the sector. In this update, we have snippets featuring Dr. Hans Langer, Mimaki, Velo3D, Dassault Systèmes, bionics hands, 3D printed lampshades, automotive repair and more. Dr. Hans Langer achieves esteemed AMUG recognition  3D […]

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Author: Beau Jackson

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3D Printing Industry

MIT CSAIL startup Inkbit raises $12M in Stratasys and DSM Venturing led funding round

Award winning 3D printer OEM Stratasys and DSM Venturing, the venture capital arm of Royal DSM, have led a $12 million funding round for Massachusetts-based startup Inkbit. Founded in 2017 as a spinout of the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) at MIT, Inkbit has developed a multimaterial inkjet 3D printer. In addition to Stratasys and […]

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Author: Beau Jackson

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3D Printing Industry

Desktop Metal reveals Fiber, a new desktop 3D printer for continuous fiber composites

Award winning 3D printer manufacturer Desktop Metal has announced the launch of Fiber, a new continuous fiber desktop 3D printer integrated with automated fiber placement (AFP) technology.  AFP is known as a method of manufacturing composite materials. Fiber’s technology combines FFF 3D printing with a miniaturized version of AFP, labeled micro automated fiber replacement (μAFP), […]

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Author: Anas Essop

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3D Printing Industry

Stratasys releases J850 3D printer – technical specifications and pricing

Leading 3D printer OEM Stratasys has launched a new PolyJet system: the J850. Replacing the company’s award winning J750 3D printer, launched 2016, the machine is reportedly capable at 3D printing at twice the speed and at a “significantly lower cost.” Emphasizing the full color capabilities the J-series is known for, the J850 is marketed […]

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Author: Beau Jackson

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ScienceDaily

Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2019: Lithium-ion batteries

The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences has decided to award the Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2019 to John B. Goodenough, of The University of Texas at Austin, USA, M. Stanley Whittingham, of Binghamton University, State University of New York, USA, and Akira Yoshino of Asahi Kasei Corporation, Tokyo, Japan, and Meijo University, Nagoya, Japan “for the development of lithium-ion batteries.”

They created a rechargeable world

The Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2019 rewards the development of the lithium-ion battery. This lightweight, rechargeable and powerful battery is now used in everything from mobile phones to laptops and electric vehicles. It can also store significant amounts of energy from solar and wind power, making possible a fossil fuel-free society.

Lithium-ion batteries are used globally to power the portable electronics that we use to communicate, work, study, listen to music and search for knowledge. Lithiumion batteries have also enabled the development of long-range electric cars and the storage of energy from renewable sources, such as solar and wind power.

The foundation of the lithium-ion battery was laid during the oil crisis in the 1970s. Stanley Whittingham worked on developing methods that could lead to fossil fuel-free energy technologies. He started to research superconductors and discovered an extremely energy-rich material, which he used to create an innovative cathode in a lithium battery. This was made from titanium disulphide which, at a molecular level, has spaces that can house — intercalate — lithium ions.

The battery’s anode was partially made from metallic lithium, which has a strong drive to release electrons. This resulted in a battery that literally had great potential, just over two volts. However, metallic lithium is reactive and the battery was too explosive to be viable.

John Goodenough predicted that the cathode would have even greater potential if it was made using a metal oxide instead of a metal sulphide. After a systematic search, in 1980 he demonstrated that cobalt oxide with intercalated lithium ions can produce as much as four volts. This was an important breakthrough and would lead to much more powerful batteries.

With Goodenough’s cathode as a basis, Akira Yoshino created the first commercially viable lithium-ion battery in 1985. Rather than using reactive lithium in the anode, he used petroleum coke, a carbon material that, like the cathode’s cobalt oxide, can intercalate lithium ions.

The result was a lightweight, hardwearing battery that could be charged hundreds of times before its performance deteriorated. The advantage of lithium-ion batteries is that they are not based upon chemical reactions that break down the electrodes, but upon lithium ions flowing back and forth between the anode and cathode.

Lithium-ion batteries have revolutionised our lives since they first entered the market in 1991. They have laid the foundation of a wireless, fossil fuel-free society, and are of the greatest benefit to humankind.

John B. Goodenough, born 1922 in Jena, Germany. Ph.D. 1952 from the University of Chicago, USA. Virginia H. Cockrell Chair in Engineering at The University of Texas at Austin, USA.

M. Stanley Whittingham, born 1941 in the UK. Ph.D. 1968 from Oxford University, UK. Distinguished Professor at Binghamton University, State University of New York, USA.

Akira Yoshino, born 1948 in Suita, Japan. Ph.D. 2005 from Osaka University, Japan. Honorary Fellow at Asahi Kasei Corporation, Tokyo, Japan and professor at Meijo University, Nagoya, Japan.

Prize amount: 9 million Swedish krona, to be shared equally between the Laureates.

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Materials provided by Nobel Foundation. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.

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ScienceDaily

2019 Nobel Prize in Physics: Evolution of the universe and discovery of exoplanet orbiting solar-type star

The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences has decided to award the Nobel Prize in Physics 2019 “for contributions to our understanding of the evolution of the universe and Earth’s place in the cosmos” with one half to James Peebles of Princeton University, USA, “for theoretical discoveries in physical cosmology” and the other half jointly to Michel Mayor of the University of Geneva, Switzerland, and Didier Queloz of the University of Geneva, Switzerland, and the University of Cambridge, UK, “for the discovery of an exoplanet orbiting a solar-type star.”

New perspectives on our place in the universe

This year’s Nobel Prize in Physics rewards new understanding of the universe’s structure and history, and the first discovery of a planet orbiting a solar-type star outside our solar system.

James Peebles’ insights into physical cosmology have enriched the entire field of research and laid a foundation for the transformation of cosmology over the last fifty years, from speculation to science. His theoretical framework, developed since the mid-1960s, is the basis of our contemporary ideas about the universe.

The Big Bang model describes the universe from its very first moments, almost 14 billion years ago, when it was extremely hot and dense. Since then, the universe has been expanding, becoming larger and colder. Barely 400,000 years after the Big Bang, the universe became transparent and light rays were able to travel through space. Even today, this ancient radiation is all around us and, coded into it, many of the universe’s secrets are hiding. Using his theoretical tools and calculations, James Peebles was able to interpret these traces from the infancy of the universe and discover new physical processes.

The results showed us a universe in which just five per cent of its content is known, the matter which constitutes stars, planets, trees — and us. The rest, 95 per cent, is unknown dark matter and dark energy. This is a mystery and a challenge to modern physics.

In October 1995, Michel Mayor and Didier Queloz announced the first discovery of a planet outside our solar system, an exoplanet, orbiting a solar-type star in our home galaxy, the Milky Way. At the Haute-Provence Observatory in southern France, using custom-made instruments, they were able to see planet 51 Pegasi b, a gaseous ball comparable with the solar system’s biggest gas giant, Jupiter.

This discovery started a revolution in astronomy and over 4,000 exoplanets have since been found in the Milky Way. Strange new worlds are still being discovered, with an incredible wealth of sizes, forms and orbits. They challenge our preconceived ideas about planetary systems and are forcing scientists to revise their theories of the physical processes behind the origins of planets. With numerous projects planned to start searching for exoplanets, we may eventually find an answer to the eternal question of whether other life is out there.

This year’s Laureates have transformed our ideas about the cosmos. While James Peebles’ theoretical discoveries contributed to our understanding of how the universe evolved after the Big Bang, Michel Mayor and Didier Queloz explored our cosmic neighbourhoods on the hunt for unknown planets. Their discoveries have forever changed our conceptions of the world.

James Peebles, born 1935 in Winnipeg, Canada. Ph.D. 1962 from Princeton University, USA. Albert Einstein Professor of Science at Princeton University, USA.

Michel Mayor, born 1942 in Lausanne, Switzerland. Ph.D. 1971 from University of Geneva, Switzerland. Professor at University of Geneva, Switzerland.

Didier Queloz, born 1966. Ph.D. 1995 from University of Geneva, Switzerland. Professor at University of Geneva, Switzerland and University of Cambridge, UK.

Prize amount: 9 million Swedish krona, with one half to James Peebles and the other half jointly to Michel Mayor and Didier Queloz

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3D Printing Industry

Stratasys launches medical industry-specific Digital Anatomy J750 3D printer

Leading 3D printer OEM Stratasys has released a medical upgrade to its award winning J750 system. The J750™ Digital Anatomy™ 3D printer, released to the public today, is made to for use by healthcare professionals. It is compatible with a new range of materials from Stratasys which are specifically designed to make anatomical models. Applied in […]

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Author: Beau Jackson

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3D Printing Industry

Ultimaker launches S3 3D printer and S5 Pro Bundle – technical specifications and pricing

Award winning desktop 3D printer provider Ultimaker has launched the Ultimaker S3. Part of the company’s S-Line of systems, which also includes the S5, the S3 was selected to debut at this week’s TCT Show in the UK. A new Ultimaker S5 Pro Bundle has been made available too, combining the S5 3D printer with […]

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Author: Beau Jackson

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3D Printing Industry

Markforged brings Inconel superalloy to the Metal X 3D printer

Award winning composite and metal 3D printer provider Markforged has made Inconel 625 a compatible material for the Metal X. A nickel-based superalloy, Inconel 625 is remarkable for its propensity to retain high strength at elevated temperatures, and is often applied in chemical, offshore, and aerospace industries. With availability for the Metal X, Markforged seeks to reduce […]

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Author: Beau Jackson