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Physicists develop basic principles for mini-labs on chips

Colloidal particles have become increasingly important for research as vehicles of biochemical agents. In future, it will be possible to study their behaviour much more efficiently than before by placing them on a magnetised chip. A research team from the University of Bayreuth reports on these new findings in the journal Nature Communications. The scientists have discovered that colloidal rods can be moved on a chip quickly, precisely, and in different directions, almost like chess pieces. A pre-programmed magnetic field even enables these controlled movements to occur simultaneously.

For the recently published study, the research team, led by Prof. Dr. Thomas Fischer, Professor of Experimental Physics at the University of Bayreuth, worked closely with partners at the University of Poznán and the University of Kassel. To begin with, individual spherical colloidal particles constituted the building blocks for rods of different lengths. These particles were assembled in such a way as to allow the rods to move in different directions on a magnetised chip like upright chess figures — as if by magic, but in fact determined by the characteristics of the magnetic field.

In a further step, the scientists succeeded in eliciting individual movements in various directions simultaneously. The critical factor here was the “programming” of the magnetic field with the aid of a mathematical code, which in encrypted form, outlines all the movements to be performed by the figures. When these movements are carried out simultaneously, they take up to one tenth of the time needed if they are carried out one after the other like the moves on a chessboard.

“The simultaneity of differently directed movements makes research into colloidal particles and their dynamics much more efficient,” says Adrian Ernst, doctoral student in the Bayreuth research team and co-author of the publication. “Miniaturised laboratories on small chips measuring just a few centimetres in size are being used more and more in basic physics research to gain insights into the properties and dynamics of materials. Our new research results reinforce this trend. Because colloidal particles are in many cases very well suited as vehicles for active substances, our research results could be of particular benefit to biomedicine and biotechnology,” says Mahla Mirzaee-Kakhki, first author and Bayreuth doctoral student.

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Eavesdropping on single molecules with light by replaying the chatter

Scientists have pioneered a new technique to expose hidden biochemical pathways involving single molecules at the nanoscale.

A team of researchers from the University of Exeter’s Living Systems Institute used light to establish a means to monitor the structure and properties of individual molecules in real time.

This innovative approach has allowed the team to temporarily bridge molecules together to provide a crucial lens into their dynamics.

The study is published in the leading journal Nature Communications.

The structure of individual molecules and their properties, such as chirality, are difficult to probe.

In the new study, led by Professor Frank Vollmer, the group was able to observe reactions at the nanoscale which would otherwise be inaccessible.

Thiol/disulfide exchange — or the principal way disulfide bonds are formed and rearranged in a protein — has not yet been fully scrutinised at equilibrium at the single-molecule level, in part because this cannot be optically resolved in bulk samples.

However, light can circulate around micron-sized glass spheres to form resonances. The trapped light can then repeatedly interact with its surrounding environment. By attaching gold nanoparticles to the sphere, light is enhanced and spatially confined down to the size of viruses and amino acids.

The resulting optoplasmonic coupling allows for the detection of biomolecules that approach the nanoparticles while they attach to the gold, detach, and interact in a variety of ways.

Despite the sensitivity of this technique, there is lacking specificity. Molecules as simple as atomic ions can be detected and certain dynamics can be discerned, yet we cannot necessarily discriminate them.

Serge Vincent remarks: “It took some time before we could narrow down how to reliably sample individual molecules. Forward and backward reaction rates at equilibrium are counterbalanced and, to certain extent, we sought to lift the veil over these subtle dynamics.”

Reaction pathways regulated by disulfide bonds can constrain interactions to single thiol sensing sites on the nanoparticles. The high fidelity of this approach establishes precise probing of the characteristics of molecules undergoing the reaction.

By placing linkers on the gold surface, interactions with thiolated species are isolated for based on their charge and the cycling itself.

Sensor signals have clear patterns related to whether reducing agent is present. If it is, the signal oscillates in a controlled way, while if it is not, the oscillations become stochastic.

For each reaction the monomer or dimer state of the leaving group can be resolved.

Surprisingly, the optoplasmonic resonance shifts in frequency and/or changes in linewidth when single molecules interact with it. In many cases this result suggests a plasmon-vibrational coupling that could help identify individual molecules, finally achieving characterisation.

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