Categories
ProgrammableWeb

ThinPrint Launches API for Cloud Printing Services

ThinPrint‘s cloud printing solution, ezeep, today launched its developer API, which enables easy integration of its cloud printing services for any device or platform. Software developers and companies which previously relied on Google Cloud Print, which will be discontinued at the end of the year, can now migrate their apps to ezeep, without the need for cloud printing expertise.

In contrast to Google Cloud Print, which never evolved out of its beta stage, ezeep has been designed from the outset to fully meet the needs of enterprise customers. The announcement of the ezeep API allows software developers and enterprises to highly automate and streamline backend and web applications in terms of printing. Business processes can then be accelerated significantly. Since ezeep also handles all print rendering in the cloud, hardware requirements at the endpoints can be reduced, saving considerable costs in terms of procurement and maintenance. Technically complex issues, such as communication with the printer or converting documents into all printer languages, are handled by the ezeep cloud.

“Enabling apps to print with our API, is not a piecemeal process, or a tool conceived for individual users, but part of an enterprise-wide cloud printing solution that can be used for all devices and platforms,” says Christoph Hammer, Senior Vice President Cloud Services at ThinPrint. “Possible applications range from restaurant chains or delivery services which print orders placed online to cloud storage, or CRM systems that want to enable managed printing for their corporate customers. The possibilities are boundless.”

Software vendors that want to embed the ezeep API into their solutions can contact the ezeep team at https://developer.ezeep.com. Comprehensive documentation ensures the smooth integration of printing.

Go to Source
Author: <a href="https://www.programmableweb.com/user/%5Buid%5D">ProgrammableWeb PR</a>

Categories
ProgrammableWeb

Amazon Introduces Data API for Redshift

Amazon has announced that Amazon Redshift (a managed cloud data warehouse) is now accessible from the built-in Redshift Data API. Such access makes it easier for developers to build web services applications that include integrations with services such as AWS Lambda, AWS AppSync, and AWS Cloud9. Further, there’s no more need to manage database connections and credentials for access.

The API is available in all AWS regions with an exception of AWS GovCloud and Asia Pacific. To invoke access through the API, execute SQL commands to the Amazon Redshift cluster through an HTTPS API endpoint. The endpoint is provided by the Data API.

Instead of managing credentials on your own, the API uses IAM user credentials or database credentials that are stored in AWS Secrets Manager. Credentials ARE NOT passed in API calls. Authentication is handled slightly differently depending on whether developers are working in AWS Lambda, AWS SDK, or other environments. For more information, check out the Amazon Redshift docs.

Ingest and egress is available for all languages supported by the AWS SDK. That includes Python, Go, Java, Node.js, PHP, Ruby, and C++. For more information on Redshift in general, visit the product page. Cost information is available at the pricing page.

Go to Source
Author: <a href="https://www.programmableweb.com/user/%5Buid%5D">ecarter</a>

Categories
ProgrammableWeb

Google Announces Business Application Platform for No-Code Application Development

This week at Google’s Cloud Next virtual conference, Google Cloud Platform is outlining a new solution aimed at enabling citizen developers to automate processes and create applications in a no-code environment. The new Business Application Platform intends to leverage APIs to help enterprise customers modernize legacy apps and create new business channels. 

Google Business Application Platform will lean on existing Google products in order to support hybrid and multi-cloud implementations, AI/ML lifecycle management, and collaboration functionality. 

Amit Zavery, VP/GM and Head of Platform for Google Cloud, summarized the goal of the new product:

“Our mission is to develop a unified solution that empowers both technical developers as well as business developers with the ability to create and extend applications, build and automate business workflows, and connect and modernize legacy applications.”

This new platform will have security features that include customer-managed encryption keys and support for VPC-SC. The Business Application Platform is an ongoing project with a roadmap that hints at future functionality including a newly announced API Gateway. 

Go to Source
Author: <a href="https://www.programmableweb.com/user/%5Buid%5D">KevinSundstrom</a>

Categories
ScienceDaily

Cosmic gas cloud blinks in sync with circling black hole

Scientists have detected a mysterious gamma-ray heartbeat coming from a cosmic gas cloud. The inconspicuous cloud in the constellation Aquila is beating with the rhythm of a neighbouring precessing black hole, indicating a connection between the two objects, as the team led by DESY Humboldt Fellow Jian Li and ICREA Professor Diego F. Torres from the Institute of Space Sciences (IEEC-CSIC) reports in the journal Nature Astronomy. Just how the black hole powers the cloud’s gamma-ray heartbeat over a distance of about 100 light years remains enigmatic.

The research team, comprising scientists from Germany, Spain, China and the U.S., rigorously analysed more than ten years of data from the US space administration NASA’s Fermi gamma-ray space telescope, looking at a so-called micro quasar. The system catalogued as SS 433 is located some 15,000 lightyears away in the Milky Way and consists of a giant star with about 30 times the mass of our sun and a black hole with about 10 to 20 solar masses. The two objects are orbiting each other with a period of 13 days, while the black hole sucks matter from the giant star.

“This material accumulates in an accretion disc before falling into the black hole, like water in the whirl above the drain of a bath tub,” explains Li. “However, a part of that matter does not fall down the drain but shoots out at high speed in two narrow jets in opposite directions above and below the rotating accretion disk.” This setting is known from active galaxies called quasars with monstrous black holes with millions of solar masses at their centres that shoot jets tens of thousands of lightyears into the cosmos. As SS 433 looks like a scaled-down version of these quasars, it has been dubbed a micro quasar.

The high-speed particles and the ultra-strong magnetic fields in the jet produce X-rays and gamma rays. “The accretion disc does not lie exactly in the plane of the orbit of the two objects. It precesses, or sways, like a spinning top that has been set up slanted on a table,” says Torres. “As a consequence, the two jets spiral into the surrounding space, rather than just forming a straight line.”

The precession of the black hole’s jets has a period of about 162 days. Meticulous analysis revealed a gamma-ray signal with the same period from a position located relatively far from the micro quasar’s jets, which has been labelled as Fermi J1913+0515 by the scientists. It is located at the position of an unremarkable gas enhancement. The consistent periods indicate the gas cloud’s emission is powered by the micro quasar.

“Finding such an unambiguous connection via timing, about 100 light years away from the micro quasar, not even along the direction of the jets is as unexpected as amazing,” says Li. “But how the black hole can power the gas cloud’s heartbeat is unclear to us.” Direct periodic illumination by the jet seems unlikely. An alternative that the team explored is based on the impact of fast protons (the nuclei of hydrogen atoms) produced at the ends of the jets or near the black hole, and injected into the cloud, where these subatomic particles hit the gas and produce gamma rays. Protons could also be part of an outflow of fast particles from the edge of the accretion disc. Whenever this outflow strikes the gas cloud, it lights up in gamma rays, which would explain its strange heartbeat. “Energetically, the outflow from the disc could be as powerful as that of the jets and is believed to precess in solidarity with the rest of the system,” explains Torres.

Further observations as well as theoretical work are required to fully explain the strange gamma-ray heartbeat of this unique system beyond this initial discovery. “SS 433 continues to amaze observers at all frequencies and theoreticians alike,” emphasises Li. “And it is certain to provide a testbed for our ideas on cosmic-ray production and propagation near micro quasars for years to come.”

Story Source:

Materials provided by Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.

Go to Source
Author:

Categories
ProgrammableWeb

Datadog launches Automated Error Tracking Service

Datadog, a cloud application monitoring, and security platform provider has launched Error Tracking. The new product automatically collects application errors in real-time. Then, it aggregates into action items for engineering teams to respond to.

“In modern applications, the number of errors can increase rapidly as we serve more users, make frontend code logic more complex with Single Page Applications, and increasingly rely on microservices and elastic infrastructure,” Renaud Boutet, Datadog Vice President of Product, commented in a press release. “Application engineers need a solution to prioritize issues in fast-moving situations that impact customer experience and revenues.”

Datadog Error Tracking processes data already available within its platform to provide the needed action items. This lowers the time to issue identification which keeps error fallout to a minimum. Multiple errors can be consolidated into a single issue that teams can remedy instead of tracking each error manually.

Key features of the new service include:

  • Automatic error extraction: automatically extracts errors for Datadog RUM users with no additional code
  • Errors view: visualization tool that uses tags and facets to group errors into related issues
  • Unminified stack traces: provides access to unminified source code to help pinpoint error causes
  • Seamless developer experience: works with existing CI/CD workflows with the Datadog CLI. Allows developers to track release and link source code to error events
  • Correlation across RUM sessions: includes data such as session ID, view ID, URL, browser, location, and OS to correlate error with data for triage purposes

To learn more, visit Datadog’s blog post announcement.

Go to Source
Author: <a href="https://www.programmableweb.com/user/%5Buid%5D">ecarter</a>

Categories
ProgrammableWeb

Vonage Launches Vonage Voyagers to Foster Developer Feedback and Community Growth

Vonage, a global cloud communication services provider, has announced a new developer program called Vonage Voyagers. This new program is intended to help build a developer community that provides the company with product feedback and user-generated content. To support this, Vonage is committed to providing this new community with increased support, in-depth training, and early access to APIs.

Vonage noted that its platform provides a variety of tools for application and product development including Video, Voice, Conversations, Messaging, and Verification services. In order to support developers that are likely to encounter a diverse set of challenges based on the variety of services offered, the company is leaning on the new Vonage Voyagers program to encourage growth. The announcement highlighted the expectations for the program:

“With the new Vonage Voyagers program, we are inviting developers to work closely with us, gaining exclusive access to pre-release APIs, as well as mentorship and learning opportunities with Vonage Developer Advocates, Product Managers, and Engineers. Voyagers will also receive training to improve their content creation skills and expand their reach, limited edition swag, and more perks.”

Developers interested in joining the program can go here to apply. Vonage is requiring that all applicants be able to speak/write English, be over 18 years of age, be able to demonstrate previous use of the Vonage APIs, and demonstrate “expertise” within a specific developer community. 

Go to Source
Author: <a href="https://www.programmableweb.com/user/%5Buid%5D">KevinSundstrom</a>

Categories
ProgrammableWeb

Hasura Introduces Hasura Cloud

Hasura, a data access infrastructure company, recently introduced Hasura Cloud. Hasura Cloud provides secure and instant access to data across hybrid and multi-cloud environments. It uses the unified GraphQL API to achieve this cross-cloud capability. Because it utilizes GraphQL, Hasura Cloud helps businesses achieve their cross-cloud goals without investment in expensive IT investments.

Hasura Cloud was borne out of Hasura’s existing enterprise product: Hasura Pro. Hasura Pro is amplified in Hasura Cloud with the addition of cloud-specific functionality. Features include data caching, auto-scaling, global availability and consumption-based pricing.

The goal of Hasura Cloud is to help data owners unlock data that is trapped in silos. Whether businesses face problems with fast-moving operational data, or static data warehouses and lakes, Hasura cloud was built to provide assistance. The primary method lying behind Hasura cloud is an approach that connects applications by federating access to where the underlying data lies. Hasura does this with an API approach that has security, governance, and scalability baked in.

Early testers of Hasura Cloud have had nothing but good things to say with the new offering. Hasura introduced the product at Hasura Con ’20. This year’s version was a virtual event that brought Hasura developers and collaborators together for six straight days of working together. To learn more, visit Hasura site.

Go to Source
Author: <a href="https://www.programmableweb.com/user/%5Buid%5D">ecarter</a>

Categories
ProgrammableWeb

Fastly Launches Developer Hub for its Cloud Platform

Fastly, a provider of an edge cloud platform, today announced the launch of its new Developer Hub, a central place for developers to easily access all the tools they need to build fast, scalable, and secure modern applications on the Fastly edge cloud platform. Housed within the Developer Hub is a testing sandbox, ready-to-deploy code snippets, and a growing repository of structured tutorials, reference materials, and documentation. By giving developers at the world’s most innovative companies the tools they need to drive digital transformation, the promise of edge computing becomes more tangible and actionable.

“Fastly’s new Developer Hub is one of the best developer resources we have today,” says Ron Lipke, Platform Engineering Manager at Gannett. “The documentation, code snippets, and variety of use cases will save our edge team the cycles required to develop our own configuration examples. In addition, the attention given to the user experience is readily apparent. The improved navigation will allow our edge development team to discover and implement self-service solutions much faster. This is a welcome enhancement over Fastly’s already great developer library.”

As a company built by and for developers, Fastly understands how critical good documentation and resources are to the developer experience. Time spent searching for undiscoverable materials is time taken away from optimizing sites, streamlining processes, or executing on great ideas. With this in mind, the Developer Hub is designed with usability and innovation at the forefront. The developer-friendly search indexes content based on several different categorizations, such as command type or use case, allowing developers to discover additional related content.

Two key features of the Developer Hub are the highly-searchable documentation and sandboxed testing. Robust, easy-to-navigate changelogs and references will continuously educate developers on the extensive capabilities of Varnish Configuration Language and Fastly’s API. Fastly Fiddle – a powerful and flexible testing sandbox – allows developers to test configurations without putting their production environments at risk.

“We have built a highly customizable platform with a wide range of developer-focused capabilities,” said Adam Denenberg, SVP of Customer Solutions at Fastly. “Our Developer Hub puts the full power of Fastly in developers’ hands by making it simpler to find the tools they need and by helping them realize what our technology is capable of. We’re in the business of helping developers be successful by harnessing the power of edge computing. With Developer Hub, we’re excited to continue building on that goal, and opening the edge up to developers even further.”

Customers can utilize the Developer Hub to support their edge workflows via the following tools, with more resources planned for future releases:

  • Solution Library patterns and recipes: Ready-to-deploy code snippets and deployment instructions teach developers how to do basically anything on Fastly, with everything they need to implement in their own configurations
  • API and language references and changelogs: Robust reference documentation and release notes provide complete access to all of the features available through the Fastly web interface and VCL
  • Education for all levels: Getting started content and foundational education help developers learn about Fastly’s platform. Includes technical descriptions, and a growing collection of fine tuning instructions and observability tools
  • Technical blog posts: Education and thought leadership from Fastly developers and engineering experts about our edge cloud platform, learnings from our network data, and industry trends
  • Fastly Fiddle: A testing sandbox to experiment with Fastly configurations and debug custom code without impacting developers’ production services

The Developer Hub will soon include more tools and resources needed to learn about and build on [email protected], Fastly’s in-beta serverless compute environment. Developers interested in participating in the [email protected] beta are currently able to sign up through Developer Hub.

Go to Source
Author: <a href="https://www.programmableweb.com/user/%5Buid%5D">ProgrammableWeb PR</a>

Categories
ProgrammableWeb

Microsoft Moves updateRecordingStatus API Into General Availability

As a part of Microsoft’s cloud communication API set on Microsoft Graph, the company provides an API called the updateRecordingStatus API. This resource allows for bots to programmatically set up policy-based recordings. Microsoft has now moved this solution into general availability. 

The process operates by tracking policies based on users. When a specified user joins a call an assigned bot joins the call and notifies users that recording will begin. Microsoft described the value of the service:

“Policy-based call recording can be used to help address compliance and regulatory-based scenarios. For example, an organization might want to store records of privileged meetings between employees in the event of an audit or other requirements for call recordings. Participants on current Teams clients will be notified via a banner. Other participants will be notified through an audio announcement.”

With the API moving into general availability, Microsoft is directing users toward a guide on Teams policy-based recording. Additionally, the company has produces a sample bot that displays the functionality. 

Go to Source
Author: <a href="https://www.programmableweb.com/user/%5Buid%5D">KevinSundstrom</a>

Categories
ProgrammableWeb

New York City’s Response to COVID-19 Demonstrates Agility of API-Led Organizations

On Friday, Twilio, a cloud communications platform, announced that it is powering the communications for New York City’s contact tracing initiative. The city’s Department of Information Technology & Telecommunications (DoITT) is planning to deploy a cloud-based contact center based on Twilio Flex, leveraging Twilio SMS and Voice as key parts of the City’s COVID-19 tracing program.

Twilio Flex is a solution that allows organizations to deploy a cloud-based contact tracing center using outbound calls, health surveys and SMS notifications. Using it, cities, hospitals, and other organizations have been able to build centers for contact tracers to interview COVID-19 patients, notify their contacts of potential exposure, and monitor ongoing symptoms even as their staff have been required to work remotely due to social distancing measures. New York City recently announced a plan to hire thousands of contact tracers to support its efforts in the coming months highlighting the need for scale and speed.

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, organizations are facing the need to be more agile than ever. For example, consider the City of Pittsburgh’s 311 information service. The team tasked with ensuring 311 continuity needed to enable its operators to continue their work even after their legacy, on-premise call center was deemed unsafe due to COVID-19. It used the API-backed Twilio Flex platform to roll out a live, cloud-based contact center in days, not weeks or months. 

The key to this agility has to do with the way APIs enable the idea of composable applications. The word “composable” implies that an application is assembled from a collection of pre-existing parts rather than having to be entirely coded from scratch.

Metaphorically speaking, it’s the difference between snapping together a bunch of Lego pieces to assemble a toy building or molding the building’s parts out of plastic yourself. In fact, in the construction industry, you often see buildings that are assembled out of prefabricated parts. The entire modular home industry is based on such prefabrication, and like Lego, even allows for some customization. Depending on the building, construction can be completed in days or weeks versus months.

When functionality like maps or SMS and voice messaging is available to developers as an off the shelf prefabricated part, the time it takes to compose an application out of those parts, even when some custom code is required, can be dramatically reduced. In today’s digital economy, each part, whether it comes from Twilio, Google, Stripe or any of the other 23,000+ “part providers” listed in ProgrammableWeb’s directory, is invariably connected to the other parts by way of its API. 

While the COVID-19 pandemic is a public health emergency that obviously demands a rapid reorganization of operations on behalf of local, state, and national government organizations like New York City, it is structurally no different than a sudden shift in market conditions to which any organization might have to respond on a timely basis. Such shifts could have to do with pressure from competitors or disruptive startups, changing customer requirements, economic trends, outbreak of war, etc. While APIs are clearly a key driver for this type of agility for organizations like the City of Pittsburgh at times like these, it’s also a reminder of how much more resilient-to-change companies can be when they embrace the idea of composable enterprises through API-led connectivity. Organizations that have started their API-led journey are well positioned to survive such change and better serve their constituents (customers, citizens, stockholders, employees, etc.).

Go to Source
Author: <a href="https://www.programmableweb.com/user/%5Buid%5D">wsantos</a>