Categories
3D Printing Industry

Researchers use machine learning to develop a stronger 3D printed geopolymer cement

A researcher from the Swinburne University of Technology and the director of French construction company Bouygues Travaux Publics, have used machine learning techniques to better understand the compressive strength of 3D printed construction materials.  Aiming to develop a process of classifying 3D printed geopolymer samples, the research team targeted specific variables, and optimized the makeup […]

Go to Source
Author: Paul Hanaphy

Categories
ProgrammableWeb

CSI Simplifies Construction Standards Communication Via API

The Construction Specifications Institute (CSI) has announced a new platform aimed at consolidating resources for working with various construction industry organizational formats. This new platform, which has been dubbed CROSSWALK, provides an API that should enable more agile construction workflows.

The construction industry relies on a massive amount of organizational standards in order to ensure that projects operate smoothly. CSI offers systems that help organize documents, manage contracts, perform cost estimates, and more. Until now, many of these systems were provided in disparate environments. With CROSSWALK businesses will be able to integrate all of this functionality via API. The announcement of the platform highlighted the value:

“As technology accelerated the construction environment, we saw a need for standards to evolve more quickly, to link between earlier and current versions, and to connect between the standards electronically.” 

Although technical documentation does not seem to be publically available, the website does note that there are REST and GraphQL variants of the service. 

Go to Source
Author: <a href="https://www.programmableweb.com/user/%5Buid%5D">KevinSundstrom</a>

Categories
3D Printing Industry

Protolabs expands 3D printing capabilities with new £10.5m facility 

Digital manufacturing company Protolabs has invested £10.5m in the construction of a new 3D printing facility.  Built to accommodate a growing demand for Protolabs’ technology, the 5000 square meter factory in Putzbrunn, Germany will increase the company’s production capacity by 50 percent.  “When a finished design enters our online ordering platform, it goes through a […]

Go to Source
Author: Paul Hanaphy

Categories
3D Printing Industry

HİDROMEK reduces costs of machinery end-use parts with LOOP PRO 3D Printer

HİDROMEK, a manufacturer of construction machinery based in Turkey, is using the LOOP PRO 3D printer to produce end-use parts for its agricultural vehicles.  Seeking to reduce its downtimes and avoid the associated costs that can occur, HİDROMEK opted to leverage 3D printing in its vehicle manufacturing processes to help reduce the time and costs […]

Go to Source
Author: Anas Essop

Categories
ScienceDaily

How molecules self-assemble into superstructures

Most technical functional units are built bit by bit according to a well-designed construction plan. The components are sequentially put in place by humans or machines. Life, however, is based on a different principle. It starts bottom-up with molecular self-assembly. The crystallization of sugar or salt are simple examples of self-assembly processes, where almost perfect crystals form from molecules that randomly move in a solution. To better understand the growth of macroscopic structures from molecules, a research team of physicists and chemists of Kiel University has mimicked such processes with custom-made molecules. As recently reported in the journal Angewandte Chemie they fabricated a variety of patterns over a wide range of sizes including the largest structures reported so far.

The researchers deposited triangular molecules (methyltrioxatriangulenium) on gold and silver surfaces and observed their self-assembly into honeycomb superstructures using a scanning tunneling microscope. The structures are comprised of periodic patterns with controllable sizes. “Our largest fabricated patterns contain subunits of 3,000 molecules each, which is approximately 10 times more than previously reported,” says Dr. Manuel Gruber, a physicist from Kiel University. The team also developed a model of the intermolecular forces that drive the self-assembly. “The unique feature of our results is that we can explain, predict and even control their size,” Gruber continues.

The detailed understanding of the driving forces controlling the size of the patterns holds promises for nanotechnology applications, and in particular for functionalization of surfaces. It may be envisioned to tune various physical properties like electronic, optical or reactivity to gases of a material by controlling the size of the superstructures on its surface.

make a difference: sponsored opportunity


Story Source:

Materials provided by Kiel University. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Torben Jasper-Tönnies, Manuel Gruber, Sandra Ulrich, Rainer Herges, Richard Berndt. Coverage-Controlled Superstructures of C3 Symmetric Molecules: Honeycomb versus Hexagonal Tiling. Angewandte Chemie International Edition, 2020; DOI: 10.1002/anie.202001383

Cite This Page:


Kiel University. “How molecules self-assemble into superstructures: Researchers control the size of molecular superstructures on surfaces.” ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 19 March 2020. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2020/03/200319125203.htm>.

Kiel University. (2020, March 19). How molecules self-assemble into superstructures: Researchers control the size of molecular superstructures on surfaces. ScienceDaily. Retrieved March 19, 2020 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2020/03/200319125203.htm

Kiel University. “How molecules self-assemble into superstructures: Researchers control the size of molecular superstructures on surfaces.” ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2020/03/200319125203.htm (accessed March 19, 2020).

Go to Source
Author:

Categories
3D Printing Industry

COBOD demonstrates construction technology with live 3D printing of 4 small houses

At the international Bautec construction exhibition in Berlin, Danish 3D printing construction company COBOD provided a live demonstration of its technology by 3D printing the walls of 4 small houses for the duration of the event, from 18 to 21 February.  The demonstration was completed using the BOD2 3D construction printer, located at the stand […]

Go to Source
Author: Anas Essop

Categories
ProgrammableWeb

Scope Technologies Announces Open API Developer Portal

Scope Technologies provides aerial measurement reports for the construction industry. The company uses real-time data to generate accurate takeoff reports that they claim are both accurate and affordable. Scope Technologies has now announced a new open API developer portal that it hopes will result in innovative uses of the company’s property measurement metadata.

Scope technologies views the establishment of a developer portal as the first step in a new strategy focused on industry integration and innovation. The company is expecting to announce several new APIs soon and is hoping that developers will take advantage of the new portal to sign up early for access. Scope Technologies is hoping that this API-led initiative will be beneficial for developers and end-users alike, while also helping to establish their role as leaders in the industry. Jerod Raisch, Chief Executive Officer, Scope Technologies noted in the announcement:

“Our new Open API program will strengthen Scope Technologies’ position as an industry leader in the aerial measurement report business, giving us a competitive advantage allowing us to continue to help contractors save time and money by leveraging our services.”

With Scope Technologies just getting started with this initiative interested developers can reach out to the company directly ([email protected]) to get more information on how to participate in the program.

Go to Source
Author: <a href="https://www.programmableweb.com/user/%5Buid%5D">KevinSundstrom</a>

Categories
3D Printing Industry

SQ4D 3D prints 1,900 sq ft home in 48 hours

SQ4D, an offshoot of the New York-based 3D printed home focused S-Squared 3D Printers (SQ3D), has completed construction of a new building, in what it claims is the “largest permitted 3D printed home in the world.”   Although many are seeking to claim various titles, the size of the structure is certainly grand, spanning 1900 square feet. […]

Go to Source
Author: Anas Essop

Categories
3D Printing Industry

The first homes have been built in New Story’s 3D printed community for low-income families in Mexico

New Story, a non-profit organization fighting homelessness, has announced that construction of the ‘world’s first’ 3D printed community is officially underway. As part of a collaborative project with ICON, a Texas-based construction technologies company, the first set of homes have already been 3D printed in Tabasco, Mexico. They feature final construction build-out by ÉCHALE, New […]

Go to Source
Author: Anas Essop

Categories
3D Printing Industry

3D Printing Industry Review of the Year: March 2019

During March 2019, developments in aerospace and construction continued. Moreover, the Wohlers report was published as well as responses on the U.S. Bureau of Industry and Security proposal to extend control on exports emerging technologies provided further insights on additive manufacturing. Emerging technologies and export control Following last year’s quest to extend its export controls across […]

Go to Source
Author: Tia Vialva