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ProgrammableWeb

ThinPrint Launches API for Cloud Printing Services

ThinPrint‘s cloud printing solution, ezeep, today launched its developer API, which enables easy integration of its cloud printing services for any device or platform. Software developers and companies which previously relied on Google Cloud Print, which will be discontinued at the end of the year, can now migrate their apps to ezeep, without the need for cloud printing expertise.

In contrast to Google Cloud Print, which never evolved out of its beta stage, ezeep has been designed from the outset to fully meet the needs of enterprise customers. The announcement of the ezeep API allows software developers and enterprises to highly automate and streamline backend and web applications in terms of printing. Business processes can then be accelerated significantly. Since ezeep also handles all print rendering in the cloud, hardware requirements at the endpoints can be reduced, saving considerable costs in terms of procurement and maintenance. Technically complex issues, such as communication with the printer or converting documents into all printer languages, are handled by the ezeep cloud.

“Enabling apps to print with our API, is not a piecemeal process, or a tool conceived for individual users, but part of an enterprise-wide cloud printing solution that can be used for all devices and platforms,” says Christoph Hammer, Senior Vice President Cloud Services at ThinPrint. “Possible applications range from restaurant chains or delivery services which print orders placed online to cloud storage, or CRM systems that want to enable managed printing for their corporate customers. The possibilities are boundless.”

Software vendors that want to embed the ezeep API into their solutions can contact the ezeep team at https://developer.ezeep.com. Comprehensive documentation ensures the smooth integration of printing.

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Author: <a href="https://www.programmableweb.com/user/%5Buid%5D">ProgrammableWeb PR</a>

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Hackster.io

OpenVINO Webinar

Discover how the Intel® Distribution of OpenVINO™ toolkit enables you to deliver faster, more accurate real-world results from edge to cloud.

Learn to build high-performance, deep learning and computer vision applications that enable new and enhanced use cases in health and life sciences, retail, industrial, and more.

To join the contest visit https://www.hackster.io/contests/DLSuperheroes

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ScienceDaily

New anode material could lead to safer fast-charging batteries

Scientists at UC San Diego have discovered a new anode material that enables lithium-ion batteries to be safely recharged within minutes for thousands of cycles. Known as a disordered rocksalt, the new anode is made up of earth-abundant lithium, vanadium and oxygen atoms arranged in a similar way as ordinary kitchen table salt, but randomly. It is promising for commercial applications where both high energy density and high power are desired, such as electric cars, vacuum cleaners or drills.

The study, jointly led by nanoengineers in the labs of Professors Ping Liu and Shyue Ping Ong, was published in Nature on September 2.

Currently, two materials are used as anodes in most commercially available lithium-ion batteries that power items like cell phones, laptops and electric vehicles. The most common, a graphite anode, is extremely energy dense — a lithium ion battery with a graphite anode can power a car for hundreds of miles without needing to be recharged. However, recharging a graphite anode too quickly can result in fire and explosions due to a process called lithium metal plating. A safer alternative, the lithium titanate anode, can be recharged rapidly but results in a significant decrease in energy density, which means the battery needs to be recharged more frequently.

This new disordered rocksalt anode — Li3V2O5 — sits in an important middle ground: it is safer to use than graphite, yet offers a battery with at least 71% more energy than lithium titanate.

“The capacity and energy will be a little bit lower than graphite, but it’s faster, safer and has a longer life. It has a much lower voltage and therefore much improved energy density over current commercialized fast charging lithium-titanate anodes,” said Haodong Liu, a postdoctoral scholar in Professor Ping Liu’s lab and first author of the paper. “So with this material we can make fast-charging, safe batteries with a long life, without sacrificing too much energy density.”

The researchers formed a company called Tyfast in order to commercialize this discovery. The startup’s first markets will be electric buses and power tools, since the characteristics of the Li3V2O5 disordered rocksalt make it ideal for use in devices where recharging can be easily scheduled.

Researchers in Professor Liu’s lab plan to continue developing this lithium-vanadium oxide anode material, while also optimizing other battery components to develop a commercially viable full cell.

“For a long time, the battery community has been looking for an anode material operating at a potential just above graphite to enable safe, fast charging lithium-ion batteries. This material fills an important knowledge and application gap,” said Ping Liu. “We are excited for its commercial potential since the material can be a drop-in solution for today’s lithium-ion battery manufacturing process.”

Why try this material?

Researchers first experimented with disordered rocksalt as a battery cathode six years ago. Since then, much work has been done to turn the material into an efficient cathode. Haodong Liu said the UC San Diego team decided to test the material as an anode based on a hunch.

“When people use it as a cathode they have to discharge the material to 1.5 volts,” he said. “But when we looked at the structure of the cathode material at 1.5 volts, we thought this material has a special structure that may be able to host more lithium ions — that means it can go to even lower voltage to work as an anode.”

In the study, the team found that their disordered rocksalt anode could reversibly cycle two lithium ions at an average voltage of 0.6 V — higher than the 0.1 V of graphite, eliminating lithium metal plating at a high charge rate which makes the battery safer, but lower than the 1.5 V at which lithium-titanate intercalates lithium, and therefore storing much more energy.

The researchers showed that the Li3V2O5 anode can be cycled for over 6,000 cycles with negligible capacity decay, and can charge and discharge energy rapidly, delivering over 40 percent of its capacity in 20 seconds. The low voltage and high rate of energy transfer are due to a unique redistributive lithium intercalation mechanism with low energy barriers.

Postdoctoral scholar Zhuoying Zhu, from Professor Shyue Ping Ong’s Materials Virtual Lab, performed theoretical calculations to understand why the disordered rocksalt Li3V2O5 anode works as well as it does.

“We discovered that Li3V2O5 operates via a charging mechanism that is different from other electrode materials. The lithium ions rearrange themselves in a way that results in both low voltage as well as fast lithium diffusion,” said Zhuoying Zhu.

“We believe there are other electrode materials waiting to be discovered that operate on a similar mechanism,” added Ong.

The experimental studies at UC San Diego were funded by awards from the UC San Diego startup fund to Ping Liu, while the theoretical studies were funded by the Department of Energy and the National Science Foundation’s Data Infrastructure Building Blocks (DIBBS) Local Spectroscopy Data Infrastructure program, and used resources at the San Diego Supercomputer Center provided under the Extreme Science and Engineering Discovery Environment (XSEDE).

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ProgrammableWeb

Autogrow Releases API for its Greenhouse Smart Sensor

Autogrow, a maker of wireless smart sensors for greenhouses, has released an API. The API enables programmatic connectivity between Autogrow’s Folium sensor network and data from other farm-related sensors.

“Growers currently feel frustrated by not having systems that speak to each other,” Jonathan Morgan, Autogrow CTO, commented in a press release. “And the truth is that, until other large industry players also provide public APIs, growers are always going to be constrained in what they can do with their data. But we’re leading the charge.”

According to Morgan, many growers use spreadsheets and manual data entry to analyze their growing data. The API will directly connect disparate systems which increases speed and accuracy of the data. Morgan continued: “[T]he API will give added efficiency to the process and unlock countless possibilities for external development of features and integrations.”

The Autogrow API is RESTful and uses a JSON data format. Through the intelligrow method, users can retrieve lists of devices, update devices, retrieve device configuration, update device configuration, retrieve device history data, retrieve device metrics, set device reminders, list a device schedule, set a device schedule, retrieve device state, and set a device state. Users can also retrieve user profiles, set user alerts, set language profiles, and set measurement preferences. Finally, the multigrow readings method allows users to get compartment current readings and readings history. To learn more, visit the API docs.

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Author: <a href="https://www.programmableweb.com/user/%5Buid%5D">ecarter</a>

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ScienceDaily

Keep cool in the pool: Novel chip sensor makes swimming pools safer

A new microchip that enables continuous monitoring of pH and chlorine levels in swimming pools will vastly improve water safety and hygiene for more than 2.7 million Australians as new research shows it can deliver consistent and accurate pool chemistry for reliable pool management.

Developed by the University of South Australia using world-class fabrication capabilities, in partnership with electronics research and manufacturing company Tekelek Australia, the new ‘lab-on-a-chip’ technology, makes monitoring swimming pools more affordable, more reliable, and easy to install — even on existing pools.

UniSA researcher and micro/nanofabrication expert, Associate Professor Craig Priest, says the microfluidic chip could be a vital addition to Australian swimming pools, particularly as COVID-19 makes people more aware of the importance of pool hygiene.

“Pool chemistry keeps swimmers safe from viruses and bacteria, yet getting it right takes a lot of effort,” Assoc Prof Priest says.

“Backyard swimming pool management would be a lot easier with a continuous and automated water quality sensor that can reliably measure accurate chlorine and pH levels all summer.

“The sensor that we’ve developed is essentially a ‘lab-on-a-chip’ — a network of microscopic pipes running through a credit card-sized chip.

“The chip quickly and continuously does all the work of a chemistry laboratory using tiny amounts of chemical, without leaving the poolside.

“For pool owners, this removes the arduous task of manually testing swimming pools and avoids overuse of pool chemicals, which saves time, money and, most importantly, the risk of infection from incorrect pool chemistry.”

In Australia, 2.7 million people (13 per cent of the population) live in a house with a swimming pool. Currently, existing pool monitoring systems — either wireless swimming pool sensors with expensive hardware or labour-intensive manual testing kits such as those purchased at hardware stores — are used to monitor the safety of chemicals in pools.

But, as Assoc Prof Priest says, asking pool owners to be backyard chemists could turn summer fun into a health hazard.

“Many of the domestic pools samples showed flaws in manual pool testing,” Assoc Prof Priest says.

“One family’s swimming pool was seriously overdosed with chlorine, yet they had no idea.

“Having just bought their home, they did a quick water check at the local pool shop and were told that there was ‘enough’ chlorine in the water but didn’t show that there was actually too much.

“A few weeks later, the chlorine levels dropped to zero, which not only highlighted a problem with the chlorinator, but also showed how quickly pool chemistry can become unsafe.”

The research tested samples from 12 swimming pools (nine domestic, two public and one outdoor public) with measures taken on multiple occasions. Every sample had its own ambient situation — frequent public use, high leaf matter, different chlorination methods — ensuring realistic sensor challenges.

An over-dosage of chlorine can cause adverse health effects to the skin, eyes, and immune system, while under-dosage creates risks of infection for swimmers.

Research partner, Stephen Thornton, Tekelek Australia says the new microchip has mass potential for both private and public swimming pools.

“Right now, the need to stay healthy is paramount for us all, and while we generally feel safe in our own backyard, we must remember that all swimming pools need to be accurately and efficiently monitored to ensure water safety,” Thornton says.

“Partnering with UniSA has meant that we’ve been able to develop a product that truly meets the needs of the market, while also ensuring public health and safety.”

The research team is currently in the final stages of developing the microchip with industry and hopes to have it on the market soon.

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Hackster.io

Intelligent Edge Webinar with Edge Impulse, STMicroelectronics, and Avnet

In this webinar you will learn how TinyML integration in STM32 ecosystem enables simple generation of FW embedding signal processing, Machine Learning and Neural Networks, and get a hands-on demonstration of the entire process: sensor data capture, feature extraction, model training, testing, and deployment to any device.

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3D Printing Industry

Student start-up Legendary Vish to commercialize vegan-friendly 3D printed salmon 

A group of international students has developed a 3D printing technique that enables them to print complex binders and proteins into plant-based fish alternatives.  Having begun working together on an EU-backed AM research project in 2017, the Danish-based band of students has recently innovated an extrusion-based 3D printing process for fabricating salmon. Now trading under […]

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Author: Paul Hanaphy

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Hackster.io

OpenVINO: Intel’s Deep Learning Toolkit

This toolkit enables you to deploy deep learning tools like OpenCV across diverse types of Intel hardware, using a consistent API and publicly available models (or your own). Talk to CPUs, GPUs, FPGAs, the Neural Compute Stick 2, and more, in C, C++, or Python.

Download OpenVINO: https://software.seek.intel.com/openvino-toolkit?cid=diad&source=hackster&campid=WW_Q2_2020_IoTG-DE_OpenVI%20NO-DA&content=dev-challenge

Learn more:
// https://software.intel.com/content/www/us/en/develop/tools/openvino-toolkit.html
// https://docs.openvinotoolkit.org/latest/index.html
// https://software.intel.com/content/www/us/en/develop/tools/openvino-toolkit/pretrained-models.html
// https://docs.openvinotoolkit.org/latest/_docs_IE_DG_Samples_Overview.html
// https://techdecoded.intel.io

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3D Printing Industry

Fortify’s new CKM technology promises in-situ photopolymer reinforcement

3D printing start-up Fortify is set to launch its new CKM (Continuous Kinetic Mixing) technology, which enables improved functionality and mechanical properties in 3D printed photopolymers. The news comes as the vat polymerization specialist expands and sets up shop in its new Boston headquarters to facilitate increased manufacturing needs. Continuous Kinetic Mixing Industrial engineers have […]

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Author: Kubi Sertoglu

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ProgrammableWeb

Binance Enhances Crypto Platform With New Lending API Endpoints

Binance, a cryptocurrency exchange that enables the trading of over 100 cryptocurrencies, recently announced the release of new lending endpoints for the Binance APITrack this API. The new functionality aims to simplify third-party lending via the company’s trading platform.

Binance announced the new endpoints via Twitter on Christmas day, 2019:

The Binance API is RESTful and all endpoints return either a JSON object or array. The developer documentation highlights the various resources exposed by the new endpoints. Resources include: Get Flexible Product List, Get Purchase Record, and Get Interest History. 

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Author: <a href="https://www.programmableweb.com/user/%5Buid%5D">KevinSundstrom</a>