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ProgrammableWeb

AutoQuotes Launches AQ Products API

AutoQuotes, a provider of solutions for the foodservice equipment and supplies (FES) industry, announces the availability of the AQ Products API, giving manufacturers and dealers access to AQ’s product data to power eCommerce, ERP systems, and online sales channels simplifying product data management and ensuring accuracy across multiple platforms through one API.

As the FES industry’s largest product database, the Products API provides a gateway to AQ’s powerful Content Core that publishes data and documentation for nearly one million products listed across the North American and U.K. markets. Customers can retrieve product information, including images, supporting documentation, pricing, product specs, and document links provided in a file that can be uploaded to websites and ERP systems streamlining the process and reducing the time and effort required to maintain multiple sources of information. With access to AQ’s standardized content, the API helps customers minimize the data management process, keeping data uniform across internal and external channels with less effort.

The Products API utilizes standard interfaces, including Open API, which facilitates the import of the data into other systems. Once implemented, the Products API can be used to populate existing eCommerce platforms or to generate a new build and help customers implement and drive online sales.

“AQ is committed to helping our customers grow their businesses,” said Jim Contardi, CEO of AQ. “This is a critical step in enabling our customers to take advantage of AQ’s Content Core to improve the quality and accuracy of data on eCommerce sites and within ERPs. We are thrilled to be offering this game-changing access to AQ data at a time when efficiency matters more than ever.”

Source: digitaljournal.com

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Author: <a href="https://www.programmableweb.com/user/%5Buid%5D">ProgrammableWeb PR</a>

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ProgrammableWeb

Suprema Launches G-SDK for gRPC Security Integration

Suprema, a provider of security and biometrics technology and equipment, has launched a new SDK that is designed to further simplify integration with third-party ID management software. The all-new G-SDK is based on gRPC.

The Suprema G-SDK provides support for languages including Java, C#, Python, Node.js, and Go. The announcement of this SDK comes alongside a new device gateway and gRPC server to support the workflow. 

Suprema noted a significant difference between this new SDK and the existing device SDK:

“One of the biggest advantages of G-SDK compare to Device SDK is that it supports various languages. For the last years, Device SDK users have had difficulty using development language other than C++ or C# which is in the sample code.”

Interested developers can check out the company’s support page for more information. 

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Author: <a href="https://www.programmableweb.com/user/%5Buid%5D">KevinSundstrom</a>

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ScienceDaily

Durable, washable textile coating can repel viruses

Masks, gowns, and other personal protective equipment (PPE) are essential for protecting healthcare workers. However, the textiles and materials used in such items can absorb and carry viruses and bacteria, inadvertently spreading the disease the wearer sought to contain.

When the coronavirus spread amongst healthcare professionals and left PPE in short supply, finding a way to provide better protection while allowing for the safe reuse of these items became paramount.

Research from the LAMP Lab at the University of Pittsburgh Swanson School of Engineering may have a solution. The lab has created a textile coating that can not only repel liquids like blood and saliva but can also prevent viruses from adhering to the surface. The work was recently published in the journal ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces.

“Recently there’s been focus on blood-repellent surfaces, and we were interested in achieving this with mechanical durability,” said Anthony Galante, PhD student in industrial engineering at Pitt and lead author of the paper. “We want to push the boundary on what is possible with these types of surfaces, and especially given the current pandemic, we knew it’d be important to test against viruses.”

What makes the coating unique is its ability to withstand ultrasonic washing, scrubbing and scraping. With other similar coatings currently in use, washing or rubbing the surface of the textile will reduce or eliminate its repellent abilities.

“The durability is very important because there are other surface treatments out there, but they’re limited to disposable textiles. You can only use a gown or mask once before disposing of it,” said Paul Leu, co-author and associate professor of industrial engineering, who leads the LAMP Lab. “Given the PPE shortage, there is a need for coatings that can be applied to reusable medical textiles that can be properly washed and sanitized.”

Galante put the new coating to the test, running it through tens of ultrasonic washes, applying thousands of rotations with a scrubbing pad (not unlike what might be used to scour pots and pans), and even scraping it with a sharp razor blade. After each test, the coating remained just as effective.

The researchers worked with the Charles T. Campbell Microbiology Laboratory’s Research Director Eric Romanowski and Director of Basic Research Robert Shanks, in the Department of Ophthalmology at Pitt, to test the coating against a strain of adenovirus.

“As this fabric was already shown to repel blood, protein and bacteria, the logical next step was to determine whether it repels viruses. We chose human adenovirus types 4 and 7, as these are causes of acute respiratory disease as well as conjunctivitis (pink eye),” said Romanowski. “It was hoped that the fabric would repel these viruses similar to how it repels proteins, which these viruses essentially are: proteins with nucleic acid inside. As it turned out, the adenoviruses were repelled in a similar way as proteins.”

The coating may have broad applications in healthcare: everything from hospital gowns to waiting room chairs could benefit from the ability to repel viruses, particularly ones as easily spread as adenoviruses.

“Adenovirus can be inadvertently picked up in hospital waiting rooms and from contaminated surfaces in general. It is rapidly spread in schools and homes and has an enormous impact on quality of life — keeping kids out of school and parents out of work,” said Shanks. “This coating on waiting room furniture, for example, could be a major step towards reducing this problem.”

The next step for the researchers will be to test the effectiveness against betacoronaviruses, like the one that causes COVID-19.

“If the treated fabric would repel betacornonaviruses, and in particular SARS-CoV-2, this could have a huge impact for healthcare workers and even the general public if PPE, scrubs, or even clothing could be made from protein, blood-, bacteria-, and virus-repelling fabrics,” said Romanowski.

At the moment, the coating is applied using drop casting, a method that saturates the material with a solution from a syringe and applies a heat treatment to increase stability. But the researchers believe the process can use a spraying or dipping method to accommodate larger pieces of material, like gowns, and can eventually be scaled up for production.

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ScienceDaily

Ultraviolet light exposes contagion spread from improper PPE use

Despite the use of personal protective equipment (PPE), reports show that many health care workers contracted the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), which raises substantial concerns about the effectiveness of the PPE. Highly sought after PPE used in hospitals and other health care settings is critical in ensuring the safety of those on the frontline of COVID-19, but only if they are used properly.

A physician from Florida Atlantic University’s Schmidt College of Medicine and collaborators from the University of Arizona College of Medicine-Tucson and the Indiana University School of Medicine conducted a novel training technique to reinforce the importance of using proper procedures to put on and take off PPE when caring for patients during the pandemic. Researchers were able to vividly demonstrate how aerosol-generating procedures can lead to exposure of the contagion with improper use of PPE.

To detect contamination, Patrick G. Hughes, D.O., lead author, director of FAU’s emergency medicine simulation program and an assistant professor of Integrated Medical Science, FAU’s Schmidt College of Medicine, and collaborators, used a nontoxic fluorescent solution during a PPE training session for health care staff. They placed a highlighter refill in a warm water bath for 15 minutes to create a fluorescent solution, which is only visible under ultraviolet light.

For the experiment, published in the journal Medical Education, the researchers instructed health care staff to put on PPE, which included a cap, gown, surgical gloves, eye protection, face shield and N95 mask. In order to conserve vital PPE, supplies were wiped off and reused for multiple trainings. After health care staff in the study put on their PPE, they went in to a room to care for a simulated patient sprayed down with the invisible simulated contagion. In addition, the researchers added the fluorescent solution to a simulated albuterol nebulizer treatment, which was given to the mannequins during the scenario (not in a negative pressure room).

After completing the simulated case, the health care staff remained in their PPE and were taken to another room, where the lights were turned off prior to removing their PPE. Turning off the lights enabled the identification of widespread simulated contagion on the PPE, both on the gloves and gowns from directly touching the simulated patient and on the face shields and masks from the aerosolized solution. The researchers used a black light flashlight to examine each health care worker and to identify the presence of any fluorescent solution.

Following the flashlight examination, the health care staff completely removed their PPE. Researchers discovered the presence of fluorescent solution on the health care staff’s skin, which represented an exposure to the contagion and indicated that they made an error while putting on or taking off their PPE.

Results from the experiment revealed that the most common error made by the health care staff was contaminating the face or forearms during PPE removal. In contrast, those who put on and took off their PPE according to guidelines had no signs of the fluorescent contagion on their skin or face.

“This training method allows educators and learners to easily visualize any contamination on themselves after they fully remove their personal protective equipment,” said Hughes. “We can make immediate corrections to each individual’s technique based on visual evidence of the exposure.”

By providing health care staff with visual evidence of protection during patient encounters with high-risk aerosol-generating procedures, this innovative training method is helping to inspire trust in their training and PPE.

“This experiment demonstrated that following PPE training improves workplace safety and decreases the risk of transmission,” said Hughes. “This simulation-based approach provides an efficient, low-cost solution that can be implemented in any hospital.”

Hughes also conducted this training technique with FAU’s emergency medicine resident physicians in the medical school’s Clinical Skills Simulation Center, which uses high-tech and high-fidelity patient mannequins in life-like hospital and emergency room settings. The center applies sophisticated simulation and trainer technologies to educate medical students, resident physicians, registered nurses, first responders, certified nursing assistants, home health aides and community health care providers. The center has created models of hospital rooms, patient examination, and emergency rooms for simulated patient treatment. The rooms are fully equipped with hospital beds, gurneys or exam tables, monitors, IV poles, defibrillators, blood pressure cuffs, simulated oxygen ports, otoscopes and ophthalmoscopes and all equipment and supplies required to respond to medical and nursing interventions, including emergencies.

The simulation team uses high fidelity wireless, full body male and female mannequins. The simulators track all actions taken and all pharmacological agents given to the patients. If incorrect drugs or dosages are administered, the high-fidelity patient responds exactly as a human patient would respond. Preceptors and session facilitators provide guidance during the simulations.

Study co-authors are Kate E. Hughes, D.O., emergency medicine, University of Arizona College of Medicine -Tucson; and Rami A. Ahmed, D.O., emergency medicine, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis.

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3D Printing Industry

CNC manufacturer CHIRON enters AM with new metal 3D printer

CHIRON GROUP, a global manufacturer of CNC equipment, has made its first foray into the world of additive manufacturing with the development of its first 3D printer, the AM Cube, a laser metal deposition (LMD) system. Designed for manufacturing large and complex components, the AM Cube expands upon the company’s existing core competencies that focus […]

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Author: Anas Essop

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3D Printing Industry

AMT and Leering Hengelo launch PostProDP systems for automated de-powdering

Post-processing system manufacturer, Additive Manufacturing Technologies (AMT), has partnered up with blasting equipment manufacturer, Leering Hengelo, to launch two new de-powdering systems for 3D printed parts. The PostProDP and the larger-capacity PostProDP Pro are designed to automatically clean excess powder off laser powder bed fused parts. Automated post-processing According to UK-headquartered AMT, around 60% of […]

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Author: Kubi Sertoglu

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3D Printing Industry

Italy arm in arm as Lamborghini steps up to COVID-19

Lamborghini has directed its in-house 3D printing facilities to manufacture medical equipment to fight the COVID-19 outbreak in Italy. The news comes after the Bologna-based supercar manufacturer’s home country became the center of the outbreak in Europe. 3D printed lung simulator Lamborghini’s Research and Development Department has been using its resources to help design and […]

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Author: Kubi Sertoglu

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3D Printing Industry

Würth signs agreement with Markforged to distribute 3D printers

Würth, the German distributor of fasteners, MRO and safety equipment, has signed a deal with Markforged, the US manufacturers of composite and metal 3D printers, to sell 3D printers to its customers in North America.  The deal will allow Würth to provide Markforged 3D printers to its customers in the general manufacturing market, as well […]

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Author: Paul Hanaphy

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3D Printing Industry

Sciperio set to use SmartPump technology to manufacture human blood on-demand

Sciperio, the research arm of micro-3D printing equipment manufacturer nScrypt, has announced a collaborative project to manufacture on-demand transfusion-safe human blood using nScrypt’s SmartPump technology. Joining Sciperio will be the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences (USU), the Geneva Foundation, Safi Biosolutions, Advanced Bioprocess Services, and Massachusetts General Hospital, forming the contributors to the […]

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Author: Kubi Sertoglu

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3D Printing Industry

Titomic signs AUD $25.5M Equipment Sales Agreement with Global Defence Manufacturer  

Titomic, an Australian metal 3D printer manufacturer, has signed an AUD $25.5 million equipment sales agreement with Composite Technology, a global defense supplier.  Titomic will provide two of its Titomic Kinetic Fusion (TKF) manufacturing systems. Composite Technology thinks this partnership will “increase capacity in the area of defense-related product and component development.” Preceding the contract, […]

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Author: Olivia Harangozó