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ProgrammableWeb

Ayrshare Launches API for Automated Social Media Posting

Ayrshare, the social media API platform, recently announced the public launch of the Ayrshare Application Programming Interface, or API, to automate social media posting. The API addresses the needs of companies and platforms that programmatically post content to multiple social media networks.

“For companies that are publicly facing, social media is important to build their brand, engage their community, and drive new sales,” said Geoffrey Bourne, co-founder of Ayrshare. “We are now seeing a fresh wave of adoption of API-first workflows which generate content dynamically and connect directly to the social media destinations. Ayrshare is the first API offering to tackle this challenge head-on.”

The Ayrshare API provides a range of benefits. For instance, platforms using Ayrshare can enable their users to distribute text, images, and videos created on the platform to multiple social destinations including Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, LinkedIn, and others. They can deploy the Ayrshare solution in a few hours, versus an in-house build process that typically takes weeks of approvals, requires complex and disparate implementations, and continuous maintenance and upgrades.

Developers are increasingly looking for APIs that remove the hassles of researching, onboarding, integrating, and supporting multiple integrations, so they can focus on their core product offering. Ayrshare addresses these needs and offers detailed technical documentation, simple API calls, and a free plan to get started.

Features of the Ayrshare API include integration with six social media networks, sending real-time and scheduled posts, deleting posts, getting history, managing images, link shortening, auto hash-tags, auto-reposting, and more.

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Author: <a href="https://www.programmableweb.com/user/%5Buid%5D">ProgrammableWeb PR</a>

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Hackster.io

Nordic nRF9160 DK // Unboxing

We check out this cool kit from Nordic: a multi-sensor cellular IoT prototyping platform for hardware engineers. Easily connect Arduino shields and standalone sensors to the nRF Connect for Cloud platform (nrfcloud.com).

Where the Thingy:91 device (previously: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tLUKgDT2V9g) comes with built-in sensors and a consumer-ready interface, the nRF9160 DK empowers you to prototype apps with your own custom hardware.

nRF9160 DK materials:
// https://www.nordicsemi.com/Software-and-tools/Development-Kits/nRF9160-DK
// https://www.nordicsemi.com/Products/Low-power-cellular-IoT/nRF9160

Thingy:91 materials:
// https://www.nordicsemi.com/Software-and-tools/Prototyping-platforms/Nordic-Thingy-91/
// https://www.hackster.io/glowascii/getting-started-with-the-nordic-thingy-91-mac-8d44e5

Categories
ProgrammableWeb

Postman Launches Postman Public Workspaces to Enable Collaborative API Design

Postman, an API design platform provider, has announced the launch of Postman Public Workspaces in an effort to accelerate API development practices through collaboration at a massive scale. This new initiative takes inspiration from the world of massively multiplayer gaming and leverages the platform’s userbase of more than 13 million developers.

Workspaces have been a part of Postman for some time now and have allowed developers to share Postman components with collaborators and organize their API work via these spaces. This functionality was previously limited to team access, but with the addition of Public Workspaces developers will now be able to gain benefit from Postman’s entire userbase. The company believes that this level of collaboration will fundamentally shift the way that APIs are designed. The product announcement noted that:

“Postman’s public workspaces will let a massive community of users engage with APIs or collections organized by API producers, with the ultimate quest of improving every API and the experience of that API’s consumers.”

Additionally, the announcement noted that Public Workspaces are not limited in scope to only APIs or companies. In fact, to kick off the product launch Postman has launched a series of workspaces that include likely offerings such as the Postman public workspace, in addition to less obvious options like the US 2020 Election public workspace.

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Author: <a href="https://www.programmableweb.com/user/%5Buid%5D">KevinSundstrom</a>

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ProgrammableWeb

IMB Bank Announces Open Banking Platform

IMB Bank, an Australian bank, recently announced its Open Banking platform. The first release of the platform shares data related to deposits and transactions. More specifically, that data includes relevant features, rates, and fees. The platform shares such information through an API.   

“Open Banking is an important step for the banking industry that we hope will, ultimately, benefit consumers,” Rob Ryan, IMB Bank CEO, commented in a company announcement. “With our data available, consumers have more transparency and choice, are able to make informed decisions on their banking arrangements.”

The Open Banking APIs driving the platform are available through the IMB Developer Portal. The initial release, and IMB’s development plans, are in line with the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission regulations. Data sharing is expected to launch on July 1, 2021.

IMB APIs fall into three categories: middle office, back office, and front office. Middle office APIs enable features like payment, core, lending, analytical, credit card, and risk management. Back office APIs enable features like document handling, treasury ALM, GLHR finance, and collections. Front office APIs enable features like banking, a digital branch, ATMs, FinTech, Digital channels, and Contact center. Check out the API catalog to learn more.  

IMB is just getting started with its open banking products. Features on the roadmap include a digital mortgage platform. Visit the developer portal for a list of all options and a roadmap.

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Author: <a href="https://www.programmableweb.com/user/%5Buid%5D">ecarter</a>

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ProgrammableWeb

TravelPerk Adds Open API Platform to Work trip SaaS Offering

TravelPerk, a business travel SaaS provider, has opened an API platform. The API allows customers and partners to build custom apps in HR and expense management areas. TravelPerk expects to expand the use case capabilities in the future.

“Applications we’ve seen being built on the platform already include HR functionality (think BambooHR), expense management systems, company payment cards, financial reporting, and ERP,” Avi Meir, TravelPerk co-founder and CEO Avi Meir, commented. “Many of our customers are tech companies full of developers, so we’re confident that if we give them the tools it will be boundless what they can create.”

To accomplish its long term, big picture goals, TravelPerk has created a developer hub. The developer hub is dedicated to meeting the growing demands of users, not isolated to HR and expense management. The API platform is designed to “solve real business needs,” and that includes an endless range of possibilities.

TravelPerk does not pitch the platform as an isolated tool to build all tools needed to run a business. Instead, it was built with the understanding that it needs to coexist with many other SaaS tools. The platform was designed with that in mind, and it will grow with the same mentality. User demand will drive future functionality.  

The platform has been in beta for a few months. Now, the company has opened it up to all users. Check out the API docs to learn more.  

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Author: <a href="https://www.programmableweb.com/user/%5Buid%5D">ecarter</a>

Categories
Hackster.io

Nordic Thingy:91 Getting Started // Cellular IoT

The Thingy:91 is a pocket-sized, cellular-enabled IoT sensor prototyping platform based on the nRF9160 SiP and nRF52840 SoC. Thanks to those modules, its environmental sensors can communicate over LTE-M, NB-IoT, Bluetooth 5, Thread, ZigBee, and more – plus, it has built-in GPS!

We’ve talked about this one before, and now we have a ton of helpful documentation on getting started with this remarkable device:
// https://www.hackster.io/glowascii/getting-started-with-the-nordic-thingy-91-mac-8d44e5
// https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xQ7hDzRULJQ

Learn more about the Thingy:91 at https://www.nordicsemi.com/Software-and-tools/Prototyping-platforms/Nordic-Thingy-91/

Categories
ScienceDaily

Parylene photonics enable future optical biointerfaces

Carnegie Mellon University’s Maysam Chamanzar and his team have invented an optical platform that will likely become the new standard in optical biointerfaces. He’s labeled this new field of optical technology “Parylene photonics,” demonstrated in a recent paper in Nature Microsystems and Nanoengineering.

There is a growing and unfulfilled demand for optical systems for biomedical applications. Miniaturized and flexible optical tools are needed to enable reliable ambulatory and on-demand imaging and manipulation of biological events in the body. Integrated photonic technology has mainly evolved around developing devices for optical communications. The advent of silicon photonics was a turning point in bringing optical functionalities to the small form-factor of a chip.

Research in this field boomed in the past couple of decades. However, silicon is a dangerously rigid material for interacting with soft tissue in biomedical applications. This increases the risk for patients to undergo tissue damage and scarring, especially due to the undulation of soft tissue against the inflexible device caused by respiration and other processes.

Chamanzar, an Assistant Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE) and Biomedical Engineering, saw the pressing need for an optical platform tailored to biointerfaces with both optical capability and flexibility. His solution, Parylene photonics, is the first biocompatible and fully flexible integrated photonic platform ever made.

To create this new photonic material class, Chamanzar’s lab designed ultracompact optical waveguides by fabricating silicone (PDMS), an organic polymer with a low refractive index, around a core of Parylene C, a polymer with a much higher refractive index. The contrast in refractive index allows the waveguide to pipe light effectively, while the materials themselves remain extremely pliant. The result is a platform that is flexible, can operate over a broad spectrum of light, and is just 10 microns thick — about 1/10 the thickness of a human hair.

“We were using Parylene C as a biocompatible insulation coating for electrical implantable devices, when I noticed that this polymer is optically transparent. I became curious about its optical properties and did some basic measurements,” said Chamanzar. “I found that Parylene C has exceptional optical properties. This was the onset of thinking about Parylene photonics as a new research direction.”

Chamanzar’s design was created with neural stimulation in mind, allowing for targeted stimulation and monitoring of specific neurons within the brain. Crucial to this, is the creation of 45-degree embedded micromirrors. While prior optical biointerfaces have stimulated a large swath of the brain tissue beyond what could be measured, these micromirrors create a tight overlap between the volume being stimulated and the volume recorded. These micromirrors also enable integration of external light sources with the Parylene waveguides.

ECE alumna Maya Lassiter (MS, ’19), who was involved in the project, said, “Optical packaging is an interesting problem to solve because the best solutions need to be practical. We were able to package our Parylene photonic waveguides with discrete light sources using accessible packaging methods, to realize a compact device.”

The applications for Parylene photonics range far beyond optical neural stimulation, and could one day replace current technologies in virtually every area of optical biointerfaces. These tiny flexible optical devices can be inserted into the tissue for short-term imaging or manipulation. They can also be used as permanent implantable devices for long-term monitoring and therapeutic interventions.

Additionally, Chamanzar and his team are considering possible uses in wearables. Parylene photonic devices placed on the skin could be used to conform to difficult areas of the body and measure pulse rate, oxygen saturation, blood flow, cancer biomarkers, and other biometrics. As further options for optical therapeutics are explored, such as laser treatment for cancer cells, the applications for a more versatile optical biointerface will only continue to grow.

“The high index contrast between Parylene C and PDMS enables a low bend loss,” said ECE Ph.D. candidate Jay Reddy, who has been working on this project. “These devices retain 90% efficiency as they are tightly bent down to a radius of almost half a millimeter, conforming tightly to anatomical features such as the cochlea and nerve bundles.”

Another unconventional possibility for Parylene photonics is actually in communication links, bringing Chamanzar’s whole pursuit full circle. Current chip-to-chip interconnects usually use rather inflexible optical fibers, and any area in which flexibility is needed requires transferring the signals to the electrical domain, which significantly limits bandwidth. Flexible Parylene photonic cables, however, provide a promising high bandwidth solution that could replace both types of optical interconnects and enable advances in optical interconnect design.

“So far, we have demonstrated low-loss, fully flexible Parylene photonic waveguides with embedded micromirrors that enable input/output light coupling over a broad range of optical wavelengths,” said Chamanzar. “In the future, other optical devices such as microresonators and interferometers can also be implemented in this platform to enable a whole gamut of new applications.”

With Chamanzar’s recent publication marking the debut of Parylene photonics, it’s impossible to say just how far reaching the effects of this technology could be. However, the implications of this work are more than likely to mark a new chapter in the development of optical biointerfaces, similar to what silicon photonics enabled in optical communications and processing.

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Categories
ProgrammableWeb

Postman’s New Schema Validation Feature Helps Encourage API Spec Literacy

Postman, an API development platform provider, has announced that its API Builder is gaining the ability to validate API schemas in real-time via a new UI pane that is accessible in the tool’s define tab. The addition of this functionality helps to provide developers with real-time feedback and encourage API specification literacy.

At the time of the announcement Postman’s schema validation functionality is only supported for OpenAPI 3.0, although Kin Lane, Postman’s Chief Evangelist noted to ProgrammableWeb that the company intends to “support all of the leading API specifications equally when it comes to autocomplete, validation, and other design-time features.”

While editing OpenAPI definitions in Postman users will now notice a small banner across the bottom of the define panel that either states “Schema validated” or lists the number of errors that were found. This information updates in real-time and users can click on the banner to expand the UI and dive into the specifics of the errors that were found. The feature is speedy, usually updating to display errors within a few seconds and provides useful information for identifying the error made.

The most straightforward benefits of this new tool are obvious, identifying errors in real-time is certain to improve development speed and accuracy on the platform. When ProgrammableWeb asked Lane about other, less obvious benefits provided by this feature he noted that:

“OpenAPI literacy to help educate developers about the finer details of the specification, as well as helping speed up their design processes.” Lane continued by noting that there is additional value in, “Providing a feedback loop around not just the APIs, but how OpenAPI is being applied (or not), gathering data, and feeding back to the OAI to inform the road map for the specification.”

This new Schema Validation functionality is available now in Postman v7.29’s API Builder. 

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Author: <a href="https://www.programmableweb.com/user/%5Buid%5D">KevinSundstrom</a>

Categories
ProgrammableWeb

Google Announces Business Application Platform for No-Code Application Development

This week at Google’s Cloud Next virtual conference, Google Cloud Platform is outlining a new solution aimed at enabling citizen developers to automate processes and create applications in a no-code environment. The new Business Application Platform intends to leverage APIs to help enterprise customers modernize legacy apps and create new business channels. 

Google Business Application Platform will lean on existing Google products in order to support hybrid and multi-cloud implementations, AI/ML lifecycle management, and collaboration functionality. 

Amit Zavery, VP/GM and Head of Platform for Google Cloud, summarized the goal of the new product:

“Our mission is to develop a unified solution that empowers both technical developers as well as business developers with the ability to create and extend applications, build and automate business workflows, and connect and modernize legacy applications.”

This new platform will have security features that include customer-managed encryption keys and support for VPC-SC. The Business Application Platform is an ongoing project with a roadmap that hints at future functionality including a newly announced API Gateway. 

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Author: <a href="https://www.programmableweb.com/user/%5Buid%5D">KevinSundstrom</a>

Categories
ProgrammableWeb

MX Announces New APIs and Developer Portal for its Financial Services

MX, a financial data platform that operates with the expressed aim of powering modern financial experiences, has announced a new platform designed to provide partners with APIs that can be used to develop personalized digital experiences. The all-new MX Open platform comprised of three core elements: MX Portal, MX Platform API, and MX Path.

The newly introduced MX Portal is a central hub that provides developers with documentation, Financial Data Exchange FDX guidance, and best practices to help improve onboarding. The announcement highlighted a focus on security and adherence to FDX 4.1 standards.

The MX Platform APITrack this API that supports this effort is designed to provide support for integration with “customer account information and verify and authenticate identity, assets, balances, and amounts.” The idea is to provide an API that enables accurate, reliable account information at scale.

Finally, MX Path is a new API that aims to help financial institutions and fintechs simplify integration with services, apps, and systems.

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Author: <a href="https://www.programmableweb.com/user/%5Buid%5D">KevinSundstrom</a>