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3D Printing Industry

VELO3D announces largest order to date totalling $20M

Silicon Valley-based VELO3D has just announced that it has received a $20M order for a number of its metal LB-PBF 3D printers. The order came from an existing unnamed aerospace customer and is now VELO’s largest order to date in the company’s two year history. Benny Buller, founder and CEO of VELO3D, stated: “This significant […]

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Author: Kubi Sertoglu

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ProgrammableWeb

Is Embedding Content via Instagram’s API Legal?

Ars Technica received notification via email earlier this week that Instagram does not extend its copyright license to cover content that is embedded on external websites via the Instagram API. This statement comes in light of an ongoing legal battle related to third-party use of the social platform’s data. 

Ars Technica writer Timothy B. Lee quoted an Instagram representative as saying that: 

“While our terms allow us to grant a sub-license, we do not grant one for our embeds API … Our platform policies require third parties to have the necessary rights from applicable rights holders. This includes ensuring they have a license to share this content, if a license is required by law.”

The revelation of this distinction comes to light after Mashable.com was sued by a photographer for embedding his photograph on their website via Instagram. Mashable claimed that Instagram’s copyright license noted in their terms of service is sufficient to protect companies that embed this content on their website. Instagram’s new stance on this issue puts Mashable’s position, and possible their defense of the lawsuit, on thin ice.

This situation further highlights the need to properly vet data sources for potential legal conflicts. It is very possible that Instagram could provide this level of protection to their API users, but whether they will or not seems unclear. 

Make sure to check out the original article for more detail on the situation. 

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Author: <a href="https://www.programmableweb.com/user/%5Buid%5D">KevinSundstrom</a>

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3D Printing Industry

Additive Industries secures €14m in funding to fuel expansion

Dutch 3D printing company Additive Industries has received a €14 million investment from shareholder Highlands Beheer.  The metal Powder Bed Fusion (PBF) 3D printer manufacturer will use the capital to expand its product portfolio, accelerate the technology roadmap, and strengthen working capital.  “This substantial investment confirms the long-term commitment of Highlands to the growth ambitions […]

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Author: Paul Hanaphy

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3D Printing Industry

TWI secures additive manufacturing facility qualification from Lloyd’s Register

British technology consultant TWI has received a signed AM facility qualification from certification organization Lloyd’s Register (LR). The news comes following an independent audit on TWI’s 3D printing center in Yorkshire, UK. The audit assessed the design, manufacturing, post-processing, and inspection of components produced using the EOS M 290 metal powder bed fusion system at TWI’s facility. […]

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Author: Kubi Sertoglu

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ProgrammableWeb

Khronos Announces ANARI Working Group to Create Analytic Rendering Interface API

The Khronos Group announces that its Analytic Rendering Exploratory Group has received strong industry support and is transitioning to a full Working Group to create an analytic rendering interface API for data visualization.

This new API will be called ‘ANARI’. Any interested company is invited to join Khronos and participate in the ANARI Working Group under the consortium’s multi-company governance process to have a voice and a vote in the creation of this open, royalty-free standard. This initiative is expected to be of particular interest to any company creating scientific visualization rendering engines, libraries and applications.

“We are excited to launch the ANARI Working Group and begin creating a standard to foster significant data visualization innovation while streamlining development efforts for the industry,” said Peter Messmer, ANARI working group chair and senior manager of HPC Visualization at NVIDIA. “ANARI will free visualization software developers from non-trivial rendering details while enabling graphics experts and hardware vendors to avoid domain-specific functionality and optimizations in their rendering backends.”

Recent advances in rendering technology for image generation–especially the introduction of real-time ray tracing–significantly advance data visualization and aid in interpretation of complex data. However, analytic rendering can lead to increased development costs and complexity that drives project time. Graphics standards such as The Khronos Group’s Vulkan, a graphics and compute API and its much-anticipated upcoming ray tracing extension, could provide powerful rendering hardware abstractions, but they are still too time-consuming for many visualization applications to utilize.

To remedy this, Khronos announced in November 2019 the creation of the Analytic Rendering Exploratory Group, with the intent to investigate industry interest in creating an open API for data visualization. Now, driven by intense industry support, Khronos has created the ANARI Working Group to begin work on creating an open, higher-level analytics rendering interface API that will simplify the development of visualization applications while leveraging the full potential of modern rendering capabilities. Such a standard will make advanced rendering techniques more accessible and widely used, while also reducing software development costs.

The following companies have participated in and supported the Analytic Rendering Exploratory Group resulting in the launch of the ANARI initiative: AMD, Argonne National Laboratory, Autodesk, The Boeing Company, delta-h, D/VisionLab, Intel, Kitware, NVIDIA, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, SURVICE Engineering, Tecplot, Inc., Texas Advanced Computing Center.

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Author: <a href="https://www.programmableweb.com/user/%5Buid%5D">ProgrammableWeb PR</a>

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3D Printing Industry

Markforged receives undisclosed investment from military-supporting nonprofit

Metal and carbon fiber 3D printing specialist, Markforged, has recently received an investment of an undisclosed amount from In-Q-Tel, a nonprofit focused on identifying and advancing technologies that could support the missions of U.S. military divisions. The new financial relationship will expand the U.S. military’s already expansive access to Markforged’s industrial-grade metal and carbon fiber […]

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Author: Kubi Sertoglu

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3D Printing Industry

Equispheres granted $8 million from SDTC for sustainable additive manufacturing powders

Equispheres, a metal additive manufacturing powder manufacturer, has received $8 million from Sustainable Development Technology Canada (SDTC) to scale its material production capacity over the next two years. With this investment, the SDTC is funding competitive clean technology solutions for the automotive and aerospace industries. Kevin Nicholds, CEO of Equispheres, stated, “This support from SDTC speaks […]

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Author: Tia Vialva

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IEEE Spectrum

European Space Agency Targets Orbital Debris, Solar Storms

The European Space Agency (ESA) received a sizable budget boost in late 2019 and committed to joining NASA’s Artemis program, expanding Earth observation, returning a sample from Mars, and developing new rockets. Meanwhile, less glamorous projects will seek to safeguard and maintain the use of critical infrastructure in space and on Earth.

Space Debris Removal 

ESA’s ClearSpace-1 mission, having just received funding in November, is designed to address the growing danger of space debris, which threatens the use of low Earth orbit. Thirty-four thousand pieces of space junk larger than 10 centimeters (cm) are now in orbit around Earth, along with 900,000 pieces larger than 1 cm. They stem from hundreds of space missions launched since Sputnik-1 heralded the beginning of the Space Age in 1957. Traveling at the equivalent of Mach 25, even the tiniest piece of debris can threaten, for example, the International Space Station and its inhabitants, and create more debris when it collides. 

The ClearSpace-1 Active Debris Removal (ADR) mission will be carried out by a commercial consortium led by Swiss startup ClearSpace. Planned for launch in 2025, the mission will target a spent upper stage from an ESA Vega rocket orbiting at 720 kilometers above the Earth. Atmospheric drag is very low at this altitude, meaning objects remain in orbit for decades before reentry.

There, ClearSpace-1 will rendezvous with a target, which will be traveling at close to 8 kilometers per second. After making its approach, the spacecraft will employ ‘tentacles’ to reach beyond and around the object. 

“It’s like tentacles that embrace the object because you can capture the object before you touch it. Dynamics in space are very interesting because if you touch the object on one side, it will immediately drift away,” says Holger Krag of ESA’s Space Safety department and head of the Space Debris Office in Darmstadt, Germany. 

During the first mission, once ClearSpace-1 secures its target, the satellite will use its own propulsion to reenter Earth’s atmosphere, burning up in the process and destroying the piece it embraced. In future missions, ClearSpace hopes to build spacecraft that can remove multiple pieces of debris before the satellite burns up with all the debris onboard.  

Collisions involving such objects create more debris and increase the odds of future impacts. This cascade effect is known as the Kessler Syndrome for the NASA scientist who first described it. The 2009 collision of the active U.S. commercial Iridium 33 and defunct Russian military Kosmos-2251 satellites created a cloud of thousands of pieces of debris.  

With SpaceX, OneWeb, and other firms planning so-called megaconstellations of hundreds or even thousands of satellites, getting ahead of the situation is crucial to prevent low Earth orbit from becoming a graveyard.  

Eventually, ClearSpace-1 is intended to be a cost-efficient, repeatable approach to reducing debris available at a low price for customers, says Krag. ESA backing for the project comes with the aim of helping to establish a new market for debris removal and in-orbit servicing. Northern Sky Research projects that revenues from such services could reach US $4.5 billion by 2028. 

Other debris removal and servicing initiatives are being devised by companies including Astroscale in Japan and Northrop Grumman in the United States. The U.K.-based Surrey Satellite is also working on net and harpoon concepts to tackle space junk. 

Solar Storm Early Warning 

ESA is also looking to protect Earth from potential catastrophe with a mission to provide early warning of solar activity. The Carrington event, as the largest solar storm on record is known, was powerful enough to send aurora activity to as low as 20 degrees latitude and interfered with telegraph operators in North America. That was in 1859, with little vulnerable electrical infrastructure in place. A similar event today would disrupt GPS and communications satellites, cause power outages, affect oil drilling (which uses magnetic fields to navigate), and generally cause turmoil.

The L5 ‘Lagrange’ mission will head to the Sun-Earth Lagrange point 5, one of a number of stable positions created by gravitational forces of the two large bodies. From there, it will monitor the Sun for major events and warn of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) including estimates of their speed and direction.

These measurements would be used to provide space weather alerts and help mitigate against catastrophic damage to both orbital and terrestrial electronics. Krag, in an interview at a European Space Week meeting last month, states that these alerts could reduce potential harm and loss of life if used to postpone surgeries, divert flights over and near the poles, and stop trains during the peak of predicted activity from moderate-to-large solar storms. 

“Estimates over the next 15 years are that damages with no pre-warning can be in the order of billions to the sensitive infrastructure we have,” Krag states. Developments like autonomous driving, which rely on wireless communications, would be another concern, as would crewed space missions, especially those traveling beyond low Earth orbit, such as NASA’s Artemis program to return astronauts to the moon. 

Despite an overall budget boost, ESA’s request for 600 million euros from its member states for ‘space safety’ missions was not fully met. The L5 mission was not funded in its entirety so the team will concentrate first on developing the spacecraft’s instruments over the next three-year budget cycle, and hope for more funding in the future. Instruments currently under assessment include a coronagraph to help predict CME arrival times, a wide-angle, visible-light imaging system, a magnetograph to scan spectral absorption lines, and an X-ray flux monitor to quantify flare energy.

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3D Printing Industry

Elementum 3D receives investment from Sumitomo for proprietary metal powder

Colorado-headquartered additive manufacturing material developer Elementum 3D has received an investment from Sumitomo Corporation of Americas (SCOA), the U.S. branch of global trading firm Sumitomo Corporation. Using the investment, Elementum will work towards expanding the marketing and sales of its proprietary metal powder, which incorporates ceramics to enable improved additive manufacturing performance. Further details regarding […]

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Author: Anas Essop

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3D Printing Industry

Cancer survivor receives facial prosthesis made using 3D printing

Denise Vicentin, a Brazilian cancer survivor who lost her right eye and part of her jaw, has received a facial prosthesis develop using a 3D printed prototype. Researchers at Paulista University (UNIP), São Paulo, Brazil, implemented its method, published in the Journal of Otolaryngology – Head & Neck Surgery, which uses a smartphone to capture […]

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Author: Tia Vialva