Nano-radiomics unveils treatment effect on tumor microenvironment

Research has shown that the tumor microenvironment (TME) can help cancers grow and evade the immune response. The TME has even been shown to inhibit cellular immunotherapy, a novel form of treatment in which the cells of a patient’s immune system are re-engineered in the lab to attack cancer cells. Therefore, scientists are now developing

The best (and worst) materials for masks

It’s intuitive and scientifically shown that wearing a face covering can help reduce the spread of the novel coronavirus that causes COVID-19. But not all masks are created equal, according to new University of Arizona-led research. Amanda Wilson, an environmental health sciences doctoral candidate in the Department of Community, Environment and Policy in the Mel

Size matters for bioenergy with carbon capture and storage

New research has shown that Drax power station in North Yorkshire is the optimal site for the carbon capture and storage facilities that will be needed reduce carbon emissions and achieve the targets of 2016 Paris Climate Agreement. There has been a growing interest in the use of bioenergy with carbon capture and storage (BECCS)

Geometry of intricately fabricated glass makes light trap itself

Laser light traveling through ornately microfabricated glass has been shown to interact with itself to form self-sustaining wave patterns called solitons. The intricate design fabricated in the glass is a type of “photonic topological insulator,” a device that could potentially be used to make photonic technologies like lasers and medical imaging more efficient. Topological materials,

Quasar jets are particle accelerators thousands of light-years long

An international collaboration bringing together over 200 scientists from 13 countries has shown that the very high-energy gamma-ray emission from quasars, galaxies with a highly energetic nucleus, is not concentrated in the region close to their central black hole but in fact extends over several thousand light-years along jets of plasma. This discovery shakes up

Tiny, self-assembling traps capture dangerous pollutants, PFAS

University at Buffalo chemists have shown that self-assembling molecular traps can be used to capture PFAS — dangerous pollutants that have contaminated drinking water supplies around the world. The traps are made from iron-based and organic building blocks that connect, like Legos, to form a tetrahedral cage. Experiments showed that these structures bind to certain

Silver nanocubes make point-of-care diagnostics easier to read

Engineers at Duke University have shown that nanosized silver cubes can make diagnostic tests that rely on fluorescence easier to read by making them more than 150 times brighter. Combined with an emerging point-of-care diagnostic platform already shown capable of detecting small traces of viruses and other biomarkers, the approach could allow such tests to

Studying our galaxy’s ‘water worlds’

Astrophysical observations have shown that Neptune-like water-rich exoplanets are common in our galaxy. These “water worlds” are believed to be covered with a thick layer of water, hundreds to thousands of miles deep, above a rocky mantle. While water-rich exoplanets are common, their composition is very different from Earth, so there are many unknowns in

Making stronger concrete with ‘sewage-enhanced’ steel slag

Researchers have shown how a by-product of steel making can be used to both treat wastewater and make stronger concrete, in a zero-waste approach to help advance the circular economy. Produced during the separation of molten steel from impurities, steel slag is often used as a substitute aggregate material for making concrete. Steel slag can