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ProgrammableWeb

Google Releases Guidance for Search Console API Updates

Google has slowly been introducing changes to the Google Search Console APITrack this API, all geared toward improving API performance in light of increased demand. The most recent changes will affect developers that are querying the API for internal data. 

In regard to changes related to the Google Cloud Platform dashboard, the company noted that developers will see a drop in the old API usage report and an increase in the new report. Additionally, developers may need to update API key restrictions, as recent changes may have affected authentication standards. The announcement of these changes provides a how-to for developers that need to update key restrictions. 

Google also announced modifications that will require developers that are “querying the API using a third-party API library or querying the Webmasters Discovery Document directly,” to update these specs by the end of the year. 

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Author: <a href="https://www.programmableweb.com/user/%5Buid%5D">KevinSundstrom</a>

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ProgrammableWeb

Facebook Introduces v8.0 of Graph and Marketing APIs

Facebook just announced v8.0 of its GraphTrack this API and MarketingTrack this API APIs. Per usual, the new releases include some breaking changes, feature updates, and deprecations. The company is pointing developers to the Platform Initiatives Hub to stay up to date with all company plans and programs.

Three changes require developer action. By October 24th, developers must leverage a user, app, or client token for querying the Graph API specifically for profile pictures via UID, FB OEmbeds and IG OEmbeds. Second, granular permissions will soon be required for an app to access the business field. By November 2nd, apps need to start requesting granular business_management permissions to the business that owns the ad. Finally, catalog_management and ads_management permissions are being decoupled. By January 31st of next year, developers with access to catalog_management need to prompt users to grant access through the FB Login Dialog.

On the improvements front, business app developers now have better onboarding options and a new reviewable feature called Business Asset User Profile Access. Starting in October, Facebook will move from target cost bidding to cost cap bidding to manage campaign costs.

The Marketing API, versions 5.0 and 6.0 will be removed on September 28th. The Graph API, v3.1 will be removed on October 27th. A number of API endpoints will be deprecated on November 2nd. Check out the Changelog for more details.

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Author: <a href="https://www.programmableweb.com/user/%5Buid%5D">ecarter</a>

Categories
ScienceDaily

How a crystalline sponge sheds water molecules

In a new study, scientists answer this question in detail for a porous, crystalline material made from metal and organic building blocks — specifically, cobalt(II) sulfate heptahydrate, 5-aminoisophthalic acid and 4,4′-bipyridine.

Using advanced techniques, researchers studied how this crystalline sponge changed shape as it went from a hydrated state to a dehydrated state. The observations were elaborate, allowing the team to “see” when and how three individual water molecules left the material as it dried out.

Crystalline sponges of this kind belong to a class of materials called metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), which hold potential for applications such as trapping pollutants or storing fuel at low pressures.

“This was a really nice, detailed example of using dynamic in-situ x-ray diffraction to study the transformation of a MOF crystal,” says Jason Benedict, PhD, associate professor of chemistry in the University at Buffalo College of Arts and Sciences. “We initiate a reaction — a dehydration. Then we monitor it with x-rays, solving crystal structures, and we can actually watch how this material transforms from the fully hydrated phase to the fully dehydrated phase.

“In this case, the hydrated crystal holds three independent water molecules, and the question was basically, how do you go from three to zero? Do these water molecules leave one at time? Do they all leave at once?

“And we discovered that what happens is that one water molecule leaves really quickly, which causes the crystal lattice to compress and twist, and the other two molecules wind up leaving together. They leak out at the same time, and that causes the lattice to untwist but stay compressed. All of that motion that I’m describing — you wouldn’t have any insight into that kind of motion in the absence of these sort of experiments that we are performing.”

The research was published online on June 23 in the journal Structural Dynamics. Benedict led the study with first authors Ian M. Walton and Jordan M. Cox, UB chemistry PhD graduates. Other scientists from UB and the University of Chicago also contributed to the project.

Understanding how the structures of MOFs morph — step by step — during processes like dehydration is interesting from the standpoint of basic science, Benedict says. But such knowledge could also aid efforts to design new crystalline sponges. As Benedict explains, the more researchers can learn about the properties of such materials, the easier it will be to tailor-make novel MOFs geared toward specific tasks.

The technique the team developed and employed to study the crystal’s transformation provides scientists with a powerful tool to advance research of this kind.

“Scientists often study dynamic crystals in an environment that is static,” says co-author Travis Mitchell, a chemistry PhD student in Benedict’s lab. “This greatly limits the scope of their observations to before and after a particular process takes place. Our findings show that observing dynamic crystals in an environment that is also dynamic allows scientists to make observations while a particular process is taking place. Our group developed a device that allows us to control the environment relative to the crystal: We are able to continuously flow fluid around the crystal as we are collecting data, which provides us with information about how and why these dynamic crystals transform.”

The study was supported by the National Science Foundation (NSF) and U.S. Department of Energy, including through the NSF’s ChemMatCARS facility, where much of the experimental work took place.

“These types of experiments often take days to perform on a laboratory diffractometer,” Mitchell says. “Fortunately, our group was able to perform these experiments using synchrotron radiation at NSF’s ChemMatCARS. With synchrotron radiation, we were able to make measurements in a matter of hours.”

Story Source:

Materials provided by University at Buffalo. Original written by Charlotte Hsu. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.

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ScienceDaily

‘SoundWear’ a heads-up sound augmentation gadget helps expand children’s play experience

In this digital era, there has been growing concern that children spend most of their playtime watching TV, playing computer games, and staring at mobile phones with ‘head-down’ posture even outdoors.

To counter such concerns, KAIST researchers designed a wearable bracelet using sound augmentation to leverage play benefits by employing digital technology. The research team also investigated how sound influences children’s play experiences according to their physical, social, and imaginative aspects.

Playing is a large part of enjoyable and rewarding lives, especially for children. Previously, a large part of children’s playtime used to take place outdoors, and playing outdoors has long been praised for playing an essential role in providing opportunities to perform physical activity, improve social skills, and boost imaginative thinking.

Motivated by these concerns, a KAIST research team led by Professor Woohun Lee and his researcher Jiwoo Hong from the Department of Industrial Design made use of sound augmentation, which is beneficial for motivating playful experiences by facilitating imagination and enhancing social awareness with its ambient and omnidirectional characteristics.

Despite the beneficial characteristics of sound augmentation, only a few studies have explored sound interaction as a technology to augment outdoor play due to its abstractness when conveying information in an open space outdoors. There is also a lack of empirical evidence regarding its effect on children’s play experiences.

Professor Lee’s team designed and implemented an original bracelet-type wearable device called SoundWear. This device uses non-speech sound as a core digital feature for children to broaden their imaginations and improvise their outdoor games.

Children equipped with SoundWear were allowed to explore multiple sounds (i.e., everyday and instrumental sounds) on SoundPalette, pick a desired sound, generate the sound with a swinging movement, and transfer the sound between multiple devices for their outdoor play.

Both the quantitative and qualitative results of a user study indicated that augmenting playtime with everyday sounds triggered children’s imagination and resulted in distinct play behaviors, whereas instrumental sounds were transparently integrated with existing outdoor games while fully preserving play benefits in physical, social, and imaginative ways.

The team also found that the gestural interaction of SoundWear and the free sound choice on SoundPalette helped children to gain a sense of achievement and ownership toward sound. This led children to be physically and socially active while playing.

PhD candidate Hong said, “Our work can encourage the discussion on using digital technology that entails sound augmentation and gestural interactions for understanding and cultivating creative improvisations, social pretenses, and ownership of digital materials in digitally augmented play experiences.”

Professor Lee also envisioned that the findings being helpful to parents and educators saying, “I hope the verified effect of digital technology on children’s play informs parents and educators to help them make more informed decisions and incorporate the playful and creative usage of new media, such as mobile phones and smart toys, for young children.”

This research titled “SoundWear: Effect of Non-speech Sound Augmentation on the Outdoor Play Experience of Children” was presented at DIS 2020 (the ACM Conference on Designing Interactive Systems) taking place virtually in Eindhoven, Netherlands, from July 6 to 20. This work received an Honorable Mention Award for being in the top 5% of all the submissions to the conference.

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Categories
3D Printing Industry

3D printing industry news sliced: Makerbot, Medtronic, Xometry, Sintavia, Formnext, MACH and more 

In this edition of Sliced, the 3D Printing Industry news digest, we cover the latest business developments, partnerships, and acquisitions across our industry.  Today’s edition features some of the biggest names in the industry, with updates on 3D printing events, a number of acquisition deals, a software beta invitation, and even a Swarovski 3D printed […]

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Author: Paul Hanaphy

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Hackster.io

NodeBots: JavaScript Robots with Arduino

This Monday might ordinarily be NodeBots Day, so let’s celebrate with some robotic goodness! Today, we have an Arduino MKR1000 board set up with a couple of servos, being controlled in real-time from a PC command line.

Learn more:
// https://nodebots.io/
// https://nodejs.org/en/
// https://www.hackster.io/glowascii/thinker-blinker-61406b#code
// https://www.npmjs.com/package/nodebot-workshop
// https://github.com/rwaldron/johnny-five
// https://github.com/rwaldron/johnny-five/blob/master/docs/servo.md
// https://store.arduino.cc/usa/arduino-mkr1000
// https://dev.to/salted-bytes/javascript-robotic-the-johnny-five-repl-3kii
// https://www.hackster.io/contests/touchlessdomore

Categories
ProgrammableWeb

GameAnalytics Releases Metrics API to Support Custom Game Dashboards and Analytics

GameAnalytics, a data resource for game developers and publishers, has announced a new Metrics APITrack this API that the company intends to simplify the extraction of game data for use in the development of customized portfolio views. This is especially useful for publishers that are managing a large collection of games.

GameAnalytics noted that the API will provide developers with granular access to essential data based on filter options. Users will now be able to query the API to analyze new users not only by the game but also by country, or a combination of the two. Additionally, the API is intended to help customers easily build custom dashboards based on the needs of individual teams. 

Another important consideration is the ability to monitor the health of game titles, both individually and collectively. GameAnalytics is hoping that customers will be able to easily spot struggling titles based on an analysis of user retention.

Game Analytics has provided documentation for the API that is available now and interested developers should reach out to them to hear about pricing. 

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Author: <a href="https://www.programmableweb.com/user/%5Buid%5D">KevinSundstrom</a>

Categories
Hackster.io

Intelligent Edge Webinar with Edge Impulse, STMicroelectronics, and Avnet

In this webinar you will learn how TinyML integration in STM32 ecosystem enables simple generation of FW embedding signal processing, Machine Learning and Neural Networks, and get a hands-on demonstration of the entire process: sensor data capture, feature extraction, model training, testing, and deployment to any device.

Categories
Hackster.io

UV Robot Design Contest // with Micron

Submit your design by August 30 to win some incredible prizes from Micron! This contest is tackling the need for effective disinfection in diverse settings, using UV-C light to destroy RNA in viruses including COVID-19. We’ve already seen some amazing prototypes on Hackster, but all you need is a well-researched and developed design to win this one!
See the 3 categories and prizes available at the link below.

// https://www.hackster.io/contests/micronuvrobot
// https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ultraviolet_germicidal_irradiation
// https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ultraviolet#UVC

Categories
ProgrammableWeb

Amazon Alexa Live 2020 Embraces Deep Linking for Alexa for Apps

This week at Alexa Live 2020, Amazon announced a handful of improvements to the Alexa voice assistant. Updates to the assistant include streamlined access to mobile apps via skills, new AI-driven dialogue management, and a new API for gaming. 

With the introduction of a preview for Alexa for Apps, developers will now be able to enhance custom Alexa skills to allow users to interact with iOS and Android applications directly via Alexa. Amazon notes that adding this functionality is simple for any application that is already taking advantage of deep links. Alexa for Apps is already being used by TikTok, Yellow Pages, Uber, and more. 

Alexa Conversations, released this week via beta, is designed to provide an easy way for developers to make conversations with Alexa feel more authentic. Amazon notes that this is possible because:

“Alexa Conversations uses AI to bridge the gap between what you can build manually and the vast range of possible conversations. You provide a few sample dialogs showing your ideal dialog paths and templates for the APIs you’ll need called, and AI extrapolates the spectrum of phrasing variations and dialog paths for you.”

Additionally, Amazon announced the general availability of the Alexa Web API for Games. This API brings voice games to Alexa via all Echo Show devices and select Fire TV devices. Using the API developers can develop games using HTML5, Web Audio, CSS, Javascript, and WebGL. 

Make sure to check out the full list of newly announced features from this week’s event. 

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Author: <a href="https://www.programmableweb.com/user/%5Buid%5D">KevinSundstrom</a>